Vigo's Smyth Kit Build - Putting the U-T-E in an Utterly Terrible Endeavor - Page 3
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    1. #51
      Junior Member indooraustin's Avatar
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      This has to be the coolest build on this whole forum. I can't wait to see the finished product!

    2. #52
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      And on the third day, this thread shall rise from the dead...

      Update time in Ute land. First, the last three weeks have been slow and without much to show, BUT the B pillars are fully riveted in. I swear the brace is 1/4 inch too short, and for the first side I did I had to fashion a small metal backing because the rivets crescented in the pinch weld when I drilled it. The other side I placed a quarter of the rivets, started to run into the same problem, drilled out the rivets and ovaled the holes on the aluminum to slide it up and get it to fit at all points. Between this painful minutia, 60 holes to drill, and the pain in the ass boron steel, it ate up 3 weeks. If you are drilling this stuff, go at 400rpm max and buy many bits in each size you can get between 7/64 and 3/16.



      From there it was some methodical attaching reinforcing pieces along the side. I also started permanently mounting the front floor shelf and other braces that had been just placed in with clekos.

      Now for the progress you can see. I pulled my fender pieces from storage, and started placing them in.



      You can also see from this picture that I installed bed tie down loops. Because I am going for the max OEM+ I can, they are actually rear door latch loops. Work perfectly, and I obviously already had two.

      My parents came up earlier and spent Easter here. They assisted with a lot of little details, an extra hand to hold here, someone to clean and paint the bumper there. It was a massive help and sped up what was a bunch of tedious but important work. Lots of water proofing and rust sealing. I did not take a picture of it, but I have some of the metal in place to seal the cab at the wire harness pass through.

      Today was working on the flooring braces. I still want to do a hinged floor, and will use the secondary door hinges from my rear doors to do that. The big L bar in the following picture will be used to brace the floor and attach the hinge.



      And now for pics of current state(again, inner fenders are just placed in, same with flooring).




      Onto the next part, as from when I get it done, I will legally be able to drive it. Brake Lights!



      These are Ford Explorer Sporttrac Tail lights. The observant will notice that Jettas have separate space for turn, brake, and reverse. Ford combines the turn and brake, and obviously reverse. Now I have 2 options. The Kit comes with amber bulbs to put into the upper spot, and LED reverse to drill in and put in the same reflector. BUT big caveat, the Jettas normal coding for turn is actually turn AND brake, which will be not good here. Next post(hopefully tomorrow night) will be the VCDS and wiring needed to make all this work.

      IF I wanted to skip this and only use the upper spot for reverse, I could just use the turn signal AS IS for the brake lower bulb, as that is how the Sporttrac normally functions. Yes I followed one in traffic solely to watch how it worked.



      Here is my modification to the housing so far. I cut away a plastic tab and drilled in a 7/16 hole for my reverse LED. I will probably have to cut the mounting tabs further, but this is good enough for now.

      Next time: brake wiring, testing to make sure I look legit; actually mounting the rear cab fiberglass and sealing in the cabin; my custom LED third brake light!
      Last edited by PillsHere; 04-16-2017 at 10:21 PM.

    3. #53
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Another pic of how its sitting right now.


      So I finished wiring together my brake lights. It was easier to cut the VW connectors than to try and find matching connecters for the wiring. I have a set of Weathertech connectors from when I did the megasquirt install in my TR6.

      They are rather standard waterproof connectors. Kinda big and clunky compared to most automanufacturer connectors, but are also easy to crimp and make.





      So again, I have my reverse LEDs wired up to the harness that was in the trunk lid. Its pretty standard, two wires each side. The turn signal and brake share a ground(along with the side marker led I am leaving out for now) within the light bulb housing. When wiring them in my new housings, I just crimped 2 wires together going to my ground connector, and routed one to each socket.

      Ford used 2 filament bulbs, and so the lower outlet has 2 contacts. The kit came with a set of these bulbs. For simplicity sake I only hooked up one, and flipped the bulbs around(via trial and error) to get the brighter filament hooked up. VW does pulse width modulation to get a lower output, so for now I feel fine just hooking it up to solely the brighter filament, unless I feel its too dim when I am testing later or if it shortens the bulb life.

      Also, when I first hooked it up, I accidentally switched my wires for brake and turn signal, but that is an easy pop the connector and swap spots. At this point, the key is to recognize that the brown wire is the ground. On the stock plug, if looking at the original connector with the ground far right(as in wire #4), then the side marker wire is number 2.



      Here is just the low level illumination with the headlights on.



      And hazards!

      Now to get the ambers to be turn signals without lighting up when I brake. Searching for amber tail light mods you can come across how to do this. http://www.golfmkv.com/forums/showthread.php?t=122284 This thread specifies how to code for it. From there:

      Go into Module 09 (Central Electronics) and take a look at your long coding.
      It might look something like this:
      14 01 8E 23 40 04 15 00 00 14 00 00 00 14 00 00 00 28 77 0B 5C

      We care about the segment that looks like this 14 00 00 00 14
      Change the second 14 to 00 so it looks like this: 14 00 00 00 00

      Basically change byte 14 from 14 to 00.
      This changes the style to how I need. I also went in and turned off cold diagnostics for the LED reverse lights.

      My last real quandry with these tail lights, aside from testing brightness, is ensuring my reverse LEDs are working right. They turned off after two full seconds. I was by myself so I do not know if this is an accessory mode thing, or related to a lack of resistance causing the ECU to cut power, thinking the circuit is open. Phil, the other ute builder, had to put in load equalizers(basically resistors). I just want to doublecheck if there is a VCDS solution for this. If any of you kind readers know of this issue, I would appreciate any imput.

    4. #54
      Member Ikey3125's Avatar
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      I had my cold diagnostics shut off for my LED tails, only to find out the bulbs were incandescent and not LED. Ended up using Can-bus error free LEDs when I did switch to LED.

      This thread is making me look for a cheap Jetta donor to do my own Ute.
      "Volkswagen til the death" -dude bro in Honda Accord

    5. #55
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Wow this weekend was chock full of progress.

      The previous week I wired in the load equalizer(resistor run in parralel with LED). The LEDs work as intended. Then last weekend I took a trip to Seattle, so not much happened till this Friday.

      Now working taillights are all well and good, but useless without a place to mount to. With that, I began working on closing up the cab and bedsides. The cab is a nightmare to fit due to the reinforced roof channels. The fiberglass cap is supposed to slide into the channel to align and make things weather-tight. To do that you need to burn through roughly 2 Dremels carefully cutting the reinforced steel inside the channels without accidentally cutting into the exterior skin of the car. This involves many cutoff wheels, lots of awkward angles, and burning your hands on your smoking Dremel(also a well placed sign to take a break).



      I don't have pictures right now, but will snap some when I pull the cab back off to show how I hollowed it out. I cut out the metal roughly an inch back, and then cut down the part of the fiberglass that slides in so that I can get it all to fit snug. The drivers side looks really good but I think I still need to work on my alignment on the right side. currently the panel gap looks like something produced down the road at Lordstown, Ohio.



      Then I started working on my hinged flooring. I decided to use the support hinges from the rear door(more OEM+). I was trying to find some sort of stand or bracket to mount to. Then I realized they come really close to the height I need just mounted on the lower lip of the C support bar. It sets it just a tad higher than where it would normally rest. The hinges give just a bit of lift when they open, so my solution to keep it from binding is to have a bit of a gap and put a rubber seal between the two. I havent found a good rubber seal yet. Also, my final goal for all the waterproofing will be to mount a tonneau cover. I have one in mind and will share some other time.





      To brace the flooring together, and give a place the hinge mounts to, I bought 2 inch L bar from Home Depot. They are riveted together, in the dips in the floor pieces. I will be buying some gas struts to open the floor with.



      To latch to floor closed, I am re-purposing the trunk latch. I mounted it in on the old rear wall, so it sits just below the rear of the floor. I will mount the peg to a bracket attached to the hinged floor. My only problem so far with this is the peg needs to be at an angle to slide into the latch. The L bar I have is too strong to bend into the right angle, so I will need to come up with a bracket that is near the correct angle, strong enough to hold it in place, but soft enough to adjust.



      I then started work on the fiberglass quarter-panels. All I can say is cutting fiberglass is way too dusty and to wear a mask. Right now they are held in by just two rivets, so no driving just yet. Still making sure I have the right fit so that I can mount the taillights and a few other items.






    6. #56
      Member arnoldcp's Avatar
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      Nice progress man! It is really starting to come together. I like that you made the floor hinge like that, takes advantage of the wasted space.

      Keep up the good work!

      Sent from mTalk

    7. #57
      Quote Originally Posted by PillsHere View Post
      XII. APPENDIX
      Still have mine for now.
      CUTTIN' AIN'T DONE YET, THERE'S STILL TIME
      OBNOXIOUSLY LONG SIGNATURE LOL

    8. #58
      Member marco-ae111's Avatar
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      Keep up the awesome work man

      Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk

    9. #59
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Thanks guys. My next hurdle on this is getting these fiberglass panels to match up right. They are hard to work with solo. I had Casbahboy over midweek to help wrestle the big quarter-panel. Still not sure its exactly where it needs to be. There is a door jam piece that is supposed to fit in, support it and fill in the space. I swear its too big and doesn't fit right. just placing it where it looks it should go, I can see it sticks out 2-3mm beyond where it should. Also, the kit gives it some fiberglass side-skirts, but I think I am going to make an executive decision and go to textured votec replicas.

      I did get the third brake light wired in. My brief testing, the LEDs are a bit dim . Maybe once i set it up in the right spot ill be happier with them.

    10. #60
      Semi-n00b BKWANAB's Avatar
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      You're right ...

      The aluminum door filler pieces ARE too wide. I bolted mine on, curved them to match the curve of the rear of the door and then used a Scripto black marker with a spacer to draw where the aluminum piece needed to be cut back (which was everywhere). I then just ground the aluminum down to the line with a high speed grinder and test fit the GRP side panels. Then it was take them off again and grind or file the high spots. There is an issue where the GRP panels need to overlap the rocker panels at the door. As long as the bottom of the GRP panels overlap the rocker panels it is impossible to align the rear edge of the door to the sides at the bottom of the door. I cut a horizontal slit in the GRP panel line with the bottom of the door so the sides above the slit could move in and would line up perfectly with the door. The slit allows the GRP panels to be fitted to the aluminum filler panels correctly too. The slit will be covered by the Smyth rocker panels when I eventually decide to fit them. Currently I've been enjoying driving the Ute around and receiving very positive remarks wherever I go.

      Before doing any of the side fitting I had drilled a couple of rivet holes and used a couple unriveted to 'hang' the side on. I soon switched to a couple of 2D nails, bent to leave 1" above the GRP as 'handles' when temporarily installed. With just a couple of nails each side, one near the front and another near the back, it was easy to put the GRP side panels on and remove them quickly. As I got near to final alignment I found I needed to re-position my nail holes for a tighter fit but that's no big deal as any holes in the top of the bed sides are going to be covered by the aluminum side top trim pieces at completion.

      After the GRP side panels had been installed in the final position using the countersunk rivets and adhesive only the join between the aluminum door filler panels needed sealing and bonding. I solved that issue by using windscreen adhesive. With the join areas suitable clean it was easy to lay down a good bead of adhesive and then using my fingers (inside latex gloves) wetted using windscreen washer fluid as a lubricant/non stick surface, smooth the joints so they appear molded together. An alternative to the windscreen adhesive would be to fabricate some small L shaped brackets and rivet them to the aluminum spacer so they would end up hidden behind the GRP side panel. Then the side panels could be riveted to the brackets using countersunk rivets for a smooth finish. The brackets may be stronger but my use of adhesive seems to be working just fine.

      I'm glad you got the trunk hinges to work for you. I think I will be replacing my piano hinges with something similar. The gap between the two halves of the floor has been increasing over time due to the pressure applied horizontally when the bed hatch is in the closed position. My first set of gas struts didn't fit as well as I'd figured but my second set are working great. Unfortunately I recycled my rear body and trunk lid some months ago when I started building my Smyth MkV Jetta Ute kit. I may have to check out the local wrecking yards.

    11. #61
      Member Blade3562's Avatar
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      Can't believe this is local and I haven't heard of it. If you ever need any help give a shout. I plan to build one out of a 4 door and R32 combination eventually!

    12. #62
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Blade3562 View Post
      Can't believe this is local and I haven't heard of it. If you ever need any help give a shout. I plan to build one out of a 4 door and R32 combination eventually!
      It's a small world. Cleveland has a really large water-cooled following. I am usually not around the scene up here, and aside from this thread I am keeping a low profile till I have it up and driving. Hopefully soon I can have it driving, then word on this will spread.

      I LOVE your 81, that was my second choice on colors, instead I am going forward with the Mountain Green. Should my 5cyl ever die, I may consider a vr6 swap, though the 5cyls are dirt cheap. I have no clue if a 4 door mk5 golf will work, I lean towards yes, but a tape measure on a few key parts of a stripped interior would answer that in short order.

    13. #63
      Semi-n00b BKWANAB's Avatar
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      Using windshield adhesive to bond the GRP side panels to the door gap fillers is a failure.

      Just the other day I reported that I'd successfully used windshield adhesive to bond and seal the GRP bed side panels to the aluminum door gap filler panels. Doh! When I went and checked earlier today I found the passenger side (which I don't use much) has separated and close inspection showed the drivers side was just beginning to separate as well. I did the passenger side a few days before I did the drivers side so it may just be a matter of time. The problem is that the GRP side panels have to overlap over the vehicle rocker panels below the doors where they are secured with rivets and adhesive. This causes the GRP panel to not line up flush with the rear edge of the door at the bottom. I eased that situation by cutting a slit in the GRP in line with the bottom of the door so the panel could be pressed in to align flush with the door. The slit will be bonded and covered by the new GRP rocker panels. This overlapping of the side panel results in tension on the bond between the bed side panel and the door filler panel. Over time it appears the bond between the adhesive and GRP, which was cleaned with pure alcohol and roughened before the glue went on. The bond to the aluminum is perfect still. perhaps there is something in the GRP resin that leaches out over time. Anyway. It doesn't work. End of.

      I had originally planned to make a few aluminum right angle brackets so I could rivet the panels together but I was so impressed with the bonding power on the 3M windshield adhesive that I though it would both seal and bond the joint. Well it has worked fine but only for a few weeks. So it's back to plan A and make some brackets and use counter sunk rivets to remake the joints. I'll probably use some of the 3M adhesive to seal the joints once the rivets are in place. The stuff looks good and smooths nicely using a finger in a latex glove dipped in windshield washing fluid.

    14. #64
      Member APURPLEKING's Avatar
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      Is the 3M urethane primer less? Some are and some are not, but most urethanes take a while to fully cure, so that tension you spoke of probably didn't let it cure 100% causing it to fail.

      Sent from my SM-G900T using Tapatalk
      Pm me for any and all glass questions and inquires, or any VAG-COM needs.

      "ITS A BAD TIME BOB!"

    15. #65
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Tomorrow will be the full update, but a quick post mainly for Phil and Lane to see how I handled two issues.

      First, here is a closer picture of how i used the support hinge to make the lifting floor. Now I would like to add a support leg in the future to fully brace the bottom of the hinge, but so far it seems to hold up well.



      Next, I used scrap aluminum of a just thicker gauge than the inner fender pieces to make a retaining bracket. When I drop the inner fender down in, it holds for lateral movement up high so i don't need to rivet it. Makes for an easier job removing in the future.



      Tomorrow will show more visible progress, lots of fiberglass trimming and fitment.

    16. #66
      Member Blade3562's Avatar
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      Love the pictures. Really helps me visualize and actually understand whats going on. I always wondered if guys shaved the spare tire well or what was going on under the bed. I personally would want to shave as much underneath as possible lol.

      The only other thing I never liked how the kit fits is the B pillar it looks funny. Keep the updates coming

    17. #67
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Blade3562 View Post
      Love the pictures. Really helps me visualize and actually understand whats going on. I always wondered if guys shaved the spare tire well or what was going on under the bed. I personally would want to shave as much underneath as possible lol.

      The only other thing I never liked how the kit fits is the B pillar it looks funny. Keep the updates coming
      So for the spare tire well, and the floor of the car in general, the bed floor itself sits 6 inches above, on those supports, to give a flat bed. Some Mk4 people have made the flooring permanent and to access the spare tire, they cut out the bottom and installed a pickup style chain spare tire holder to access underneath. I am of the opinion that since these are uni-bodies, any extra metal removed increases flex. So you can kinda see where I left parts of the side and cut only as far as I needed to to avoid taking too much out. The B pillars are limited, I wish the opening was not 4 circles and you could put a real window there. However I am certain it was done that way to keep that panel stiff. And let me tell you, its a pain to work with. Some cut holes in the fiberglass to still let light through there. I will probably wait till the very end to decide.

      Onto weekend update:

      My parents came up and did an amazing job helping me. Most of the work was tedious, measure, cut, measure, cut ad nauseum. Since I am on to the fit and finish of exterior pieces, 4 hours can get sucked into one tiny gap that I am trying to fix. Luckily, my parents also helped document what we did.



      (Not my Beetle Vert. I live in a duplex, the upstairs tenant has to deal with my shenanigans.)



      Saturday was working on getting the inner fenders to fit right in, and finally bolt in the front bed support brace, which was held by clecos until I realized it was pinched in and not moving no matter what. Going back to the picture I posted last night, the front tab of the inner fender goes down into the slot between the front "Shelf" and the first brace. I have one bolt that goes through all 3 to pull it forward and in. I have one bolt going through the bedside, into the inner lip of the front part on the inner fender(its drilled about 3 inches above the front brace). The tabs in yesterdays update hold the top part, and at the tail I have another bolt going through the bedside to tie in the inner lip near the tail. These points draw it in nice and neat to the bedside, and I can remove them relatively easily.



      After that came the door jam piece. This piece has been difficult, as I don't think the CNC cut layout is correct. The picture below shows when we first tried putting it in after I had handbent it to follow the curve of the body. We ended up having to cut the lower part of the bottom tab to help draw it closer in, and do a ton of cutoff wheel work to slowly get it to fit down into the body correctly. We now have it fitting a lot better on both sides, but I still have to grind it down in a little bit more in spots. This was taking forever, just sharpie each next spot I needed to grind, then refit.



      However, its good enough now that I can fit the side panels on with some confidence that they sit where I need. The fenders are purposely about 1/2 and inch too long, so you have to slowly shave down the edge at the door jam to get the door to close. Fiberglass dust is nasty(use a mask/respirator), and guaranteed to go all over your freshly redone interior . But now the doors on both sides close, and I have everything sitting about where I want.





      I also spent 2-3 hours getting the tailgate to sit correctly, very happy with how it closes now, and it looks close to flush on each side. Tonight I am redoing my wiring for the taillights, as I realized my layout didn't allow for easy connection once the fenders are on. Next up will be fitting the roll pan.

    18. #68
      Semi-n00b BKWANAB's Avatar
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      Using windshield adhesive to bond the GRP side panels to the door gap fillers is a failure.

      I admit I did not use any 3M primer. I've not had to use it previously when installing glass so ... I service small portable MRI systems that use multiple neodymium permanent magnets. I used several of the smallest (1' x 1/2" x 4") placed on the steel door panel to hold the GRP panels in perfect alignment. 3" stuck on the door with a 1 " overlap was plenty to keep the GRP firmly in the windshield adhesive bead and I used plenty of adhesive too. At least twice as much as I'd use to install a windscreen. The setup was left for over three days to ensure the adhesive would cure completely.

      I think it was just a bad application for adhesives of this type. I used it as I had it available. It's intended for compression joints so I shouldn't be surpized that a tension joint didn't work. I suspect it would have been fine in the GRP panels did not end up sticking out above the plane of the door panel requiring some pressure to bring everything into alignment. It didn't work so I've uninstalled the filler panels, removed the adhesive (it just pretty much peeled off), made some aluminum brackets from 1" angle extrusion cut off in 1" lengths, deburred and riveted onto the panel using countersunk rivets. Everything test fits well and securely. Now I plan to remove the panel and brackets and use Fuze-It industrial adhesive under the brackets as I re-rivet everything in place for the last time. Once everything has had time to set securely I will run a bead of some sealant smoothed to provide a clean surface for painting the panel.

    19. #69
      Semi-n00b BKWANAB's Avatar
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      Bed hatch hinges and clip on wheel well covers.

      Thanks for the hinge pics. The trunk lid hinges certainly look sturdy enough. It's a pity I disposed of my rear bodywork before you mentioned you were going to use them. I think I would have done the same. You mention using a prop to hold the hatch open which was my original plan, on the basis of KISS, keep it simple, stupid. I went to using two gas struts as a single prop left the hatch twisting/flexing. It is not stiff enough in my experience. My using the gas struts is working well, once I got the correct length worked out, but as I mentioned before, the compression force when the hatch is down has caused the piano hinge gap between the two floor parts to be pushed open a little. My original 1/16" gap has expanded to around 1/4" now. I'll let y'all know what has allowed that to occur once I remove the floor and hatch to see what's going on. I'm hoping a switch from aluminum rivets to stainless steel ones will strengthen the hinge pivot and keep the gap small. This will have to wait until I've finished the engine mechanicals (new plugs, coils, valve cover gasket, de-carbon the intake ports, replace the HPFP cam follower, install a remote air cleaner and oil separation can for the PCV system and change the oil and filter). These are nearly done so I'll get to the hatch probably next week and see what's up.

      Your way to 'clip' the wheel arch covers on is ingenious. I have presumed that riveting these on was to improve the vehicle stiffness since so much structure is removed in this area. It will be interesting to see how this holds up. They could be a source of some rattles over time but the bolts you've installed will hopefully handle that. You'll definitely need a second floor brace adjacent to the hatch hinge line. I can't imagine the hatch won't sag under use without one. I can feel the aluminum floor panels flex a little as I walk on them and I already have that extra brace installed. I forgot to warn you to lengthen the rear light wiring. I made the same error. Everything looks plenty long enough until you start fitting the GRP bed side panels. Make sure the wiring is long enough that you can hang the light assembly over the tailgate supports. This makes it far easier when checking lighting connections as then you can see them easily from inside the cab if necessary.

      I plan to close the gap between the bottom of the tailgate and the roll pan. The OEM size gap looks unfinished. I was just going to rivet some aluminum angle to the top of the roll pan that could be molded in and painted but ... I think I'm going to install a row of white LEDs in the gap. Not too bright but enough to provide a great spread of white light when backing up at night. Anything would be better than the Smyth offering but this could be awesome. There are some LEDs that can have a range of colors such as red, yellow, blue, etc. Red might be nice to have as another brake light. Some can be wired in segments so one could even do sequential turn indicators. That would be kewl! But, I'll probably just do the white reversing lights. KISS.

      Your Utterly Terrible Endeavor is coming along nicely and looking good. My wife thought mine was a Useless Training Exercise for a while. But every time we drive the UTE it becomes a Unique Transportation Event.

    20. #70
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Well two nights in a row of failing to glue in the cab. I know I need enough time to be patient with it, and my nights get whittled down to an hour here or there.

      So instead:



      So here is where the fun trick of this is. It runs off the defrost button. The circuit is 12v, and is powering a strip of 5050 Daylight LEDs. I used VCDS to change the power time, I think its 10 mins now, but but you can set a wide range. Only negative, car must be on. I may swap so this circuit runs an interior light and I hook up a discrete switch, but for now I am very happy with how it turned out. Now on to mapping out where to cut for my license plate lights, while I have a celebratory drink.

    21. #71
      Member Blade3562's Avatar
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      Dumb quetsion, but did you ever discover what the extra wiring on the Eos seat was? I have an Eos and I looked at the seat, only "extra" features it has are the power slider for getting in and out, and the rear footwell lights. I plan to do the opposite and install Golf seats in my Eos. I hate how uncomfortable they are lol.

    22. #72
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Blade3562 View Post
      Dumb quetsion, but did you ever discover what the extra wiring on the Eos seat was? I have an Eos and I looked at the seat, only "extra" features it has are the power slider for getting in and out, and the rear footwell lights. I plan to do the opposite and install Golf seats in my Eos. I hate how uncomfortable they are lol.
      Yea, thankfully VW has been very specific about how they arrange the wires, so its pretty easy to swap between. In the big 10pin connector at the seat bottom(on page 2), pin 8 is the lumbar motor, pin 7 is the can - /ground, and pin 6 is can+. The can wires are for the ease of entry buttons that are on the shoulders. Since the Eos has the full gamut of modules, pretty much any mk5/6 seats should swap in as they have less features and will not use every seat setting. I just looked at my Golf R connector, I have no pin 9 which I assume is the motorized front - back track. I do have the lumbar support(pin 8), and the pin 6/7 are empty as these seats do not have ease of entry.

      Speaking of your Eos, I just saw your thread, I like your color choices. I have seen you on the 480 bridge during my morning commute. I got the RB 2 door Golf R, work over in Orange. I plan on working on the car this weekend, and a buddy is coming over to work on his. I will PM you my details if you want to swing by. Any other Clevelanders wanting to check it out just send me a message.

    23. #73
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Holiday update time!

      First, the cab is glued in! Everything I have screwed up now cannot be undone!



      Temporarily, I have the lower part of the drivers side quarter panel attached. Eventually this will be covered by side skirts I have ordered. I am not sure how I will handle all the overlaps yet. I still need to trim the door gap piece to allow the fiberglass to sit closer.



      Next up is the brace for the floor and the gas struts to assist in lifting it. It turns out that Home Depot deck brackets and an L bar are perfect to add extra reinforcement.

      I copied Phil's work, bought two short travel 30lb shocks. Since a lot of their action is lifting at an angle, they essentially just soften the closing of the decklid, it still needs some lifting to fully open. I didn't think about taking a picture with the floor in place, but here is a picture of the backside of it with mounts installed.



      I am actually reusing the door rubber seals as trim edging on the floor.



      We did manage to save the solenoid and actuator of the gas cover so that it stays OEM functional. The fiberglass sticks out more than the old fender. To get the lip of the fiberglass to sit in better around the fuel filler, I had to take a cutoff grinder all around the fuel cover area. Burning hot metal and fuel anyone? After getting it to sit well, and trimming the fiberglass as much as possible, it became apparent that we needed to shave the backside of the gas cover piece so that it could sit down in the indent better. After all that, the mechanism didn't to work for several reasons. First, the fender is still out a bit, so the actuator needed to be pulled towards the outside a bit. But, the body brace it is mounted to is now not reinforced, so the unit would flex and not line up. Enter super secret copyrighted bracing invention...



      ...It is a wood block.

      Next, it didn't line up right and the striker would bind. Removing the rubber around where it enters the filler area assisted in reducing the bind. Lastly, the striker was now too long because all of this pulled it 2mm or so forward, so it would never release the cap. A razor blade solved that problem!

      A ton of time went into the rear tail light areas to get the quarter panels and lights to fit. I am still working on trying to get all the lines to match up at the rear, between the tail lights with the tailgate, the tailgate and the quarter panels, and the "bumper" lines on the quarter panel with the flair out of the tailgate. This is probably the single most nerve-racking part of the build. Finally though, I have the roll pan hanging in place. I still need to adjust and trim before I feel comfortable riveting it to the other pieces, but its real close.



    24. #74
      Member Blade3562's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by PillsHere View Post
      Yea, thankfully VW has been very specific about how they arrange the wires, so its pretty easy to swap between. In the big 10pin connector at the seat bottom(on page 2), pin 8 is the lumbar motor, pin 7 is the can - /ground, and pin 6 is can+. The can wires are for the ease of entry buttons that are on the shoulders. Since the Eos has the full gamut of modules, pretty much any mk5/6 seats should swap in as they have less features and will not use every seat setting. I just looked at my Golf R connector, I have no pin 9 which I assume is the motorized front - back track. I do have the lumbar support(pin 8), and the pin 6/7 are empty as these seats do not have ease of entry.

      Speaking of your Eos, I just saw your thread, I like your color choices. I have seen you on the 480 bridge during my morning commute. I got the RB 2 door Golf R, work over in Orange. I plan on working on the car this weekend, and a buddy is coming over to work on his. I will PM you my details if you want to swing by. Any other Clevelanders wanting to check it out just send me a message.
      I sent you a message I was out at Carlisle that weekend I work downtown at Burke Lakefront overnight and get off at 7AM so I'm typically going the opposite direction of everyone lol! If you ever saw a slammed Mk1 Cabriolet(Green or Silver) that was probably me. Sold them both to buy my Eos. You have the best Golf R you can get! I wish they would have kept the 2 door for the Mk7.

      I'll pull the connector on my Mk7 seats tonight, I'm really hoping I can just drop a set of them in my Eos. They are much more comfortable for me! But first I need to solve this battery drain problem

    25. #75
      Junior Member PillsHere's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Blade3562 View Post
      I sent you a message I was out at Carlisle that weekend I work downtown at Burke Lakefront overnight and get off at 7AM so I'm typically going the opposite direction of everyone lol! If you ever saw a slammed Mk1 Cabriolet(Green or Silver) that was probably me. Sold them both to buy my Eos. You have the best Golf R you can get! I wish they would have kept the 2 door for the Mk7.

      I'll pull the connector on my Mk7 seats tonight, I'm really hoping I can just drop a set of them in my Eos. They are much more comfortable for me! But first I need to solve this battery drain problem
      Ha, sorry about my slow response, lifes been crazy this week. I am up in the air on whether I will be working on the ute this weekend, or hitting up an autocross event with the ASCC group. Anyways, share the connector photo here, if nothing else than to show how they all look. Do you know if mk7s share the same seat rails? I am assuming they do. Just remember, you wont have the shoulder release.

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