We arrest 10 year olds?
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    1. #1

      We arrest 10 year olds?

      For kicking a teacher?

      I'm not sure the truth behind if the child does have a diagnosis of some kind and school did not accommodate the child and the child did something a child with that condition could do.

      IF a 10 year old is in something serious enough that you're considering this, why not take the child to somewhere to be properly cared for (foster/special needs school) and arrest the ADULT parent instead?

      WTF is wrong with people. You can argue kids making adult decisions, but at 10? Maybe 12 or 13, but 10? That's possibly a 5th grader. Elementary school.

      A child in jail. This country man, WTF is wrong with us.

      http://www.cbsnews.com/news/john-ben...ted-at-school/

    2. #2
      Member Bladecatcher's Avatar
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      Do 10 year olds go to juvenile detention? Yes. And that's where he went.

    3. #3
      Member DonL's Avatar
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      Per the article,
      “He didn’t feel good with a paraprofessional. He told me that and I told him you got to go back to school. He said, ‘I don’t want to go back to school. I don’t like him. I don’t like him. He hurts me,’” she said.
      I'd want to know exactly what the hell the parapro is doing that is hurting my child. Until the school settles that issue, the rest is bull****.

      Kids on the spectrum very often have poor impulse control. It takes a ton of therapy and often medications to get that under any reasonable type of control, and even then it's not always successful. The poor impulse control leads to exaggerated fight-or-flight responses. If the child is interpreting the actions of the parapro as hurtful, nobody should be surprised if the child lashes out in some type of self-defense response.

      Where would the child be "properly cared for"? IDEA says that children with disabilities and/or other special needs are to be provided access to an appropriate public education. Most school systems have sufficient systems and programs in place to accommodate that. The rest are operating from some stone age how-to-educate-your-child handbook.

      Disclaimer: My daughter is special needs, and I have a dog in this fight locally to make sure she is safe, as well as is the school, her teachers, and fellow students. We work really hard with her to keep her regulated, rested, well-fed, and less apt to have behavioral issues. She still does sometimes, though.

      I'd be absolutely livid and likely in touch with an attorney if my child were handled like this. The school may have some legal grounds, but so does the child. It may be a sign the school system just doesn't give a crap, or doesn't want to deal with or accommodate the child anymore. They've given up on the child. Imagine a parent's devastation if you have a child with problems, and the school shrugs their shoulders and says there's nothing they can do for your kid, you're on your own.
      Last edited by DonL; 04-19-2017 at 04:25 PM.
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    4. #4
      Member LT1M21Stingray's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Mk1Madness
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    5. #5
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      Gotta feed that industrial prison complex

    6. #6
      Member bmann's Avatar
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      Can't do the time, don't do the crime. How is that hard to understand?


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    7. #7
      I have a special needs daughter that's only 2.5.... not looking forward to her growing up and having to deal with others! I swear I'll be the one ending up in jail for royally ****ing someone up that messes with her! It's going to take an extreme amount of patience from me

    8. #8
      Member BetterByDesign's Avatar
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      "His mother said this stems from when he kicked a paraprofessional at Okeechobee Alternative Academy in December 2016. The altercation allegedly left the teacher with scratches and other marks, CBS affiliate WPEC-TV reported."
      What is a paraprofessional and why can't you kick one if you're 10?

      I am sure he'll grow up without any issues or predjudice towards authority now.
      Last edited by BetterByDesign; 04-20-2017 at 01:05 AM.
      ______________________________________________

    9. #9
      Quote Originally Posted by bmann View Post
      Can't do the time, don't do the crime. How is that hard to understand?


      For an autistic kid, extremely difficult to understand. If not impossible to understand.

      Did you watch the video?

      A lot of kids on the spectrum do not like to be touched, have their personal space invaded, and some do not like contact of any sort (verbal, eye contact, physical) with people they do not know.

      The kid was telling the police he does not like to be touched. And he was not doing it in a "GET YOUR DAMN HANDS OFF ME" sort of way, so he wasnt trying to give the police trouble.

      Even the adult was telling he was on the spectrum and did not like to be touched.

      The system failed this family in every way possible.

    10. #10
      Senior Member @McMike's Avatar
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      This part is weird.
      In October, John was expelled from school and forced to complete work from home.
      OK. Problem "solved"
      But last Wednesday, when he reported back to school for the first time in five months for state testing, things didn’t go as planned. A school resource officer recognized him and confirmed he still had an outstanding warrant for the assault, WPEC reported
      He went back for some state testing, and was arrested for being there?

      There has to be something missing. How is the kid supposed to take these tests? Was the school not notified he would be returning for the test? Are there other schools/testing centers available that he hadn't been expelled from? Am I wrong to assume that since he had been expelled that the case was closed? Why was there still a warrant out on him?

    11. #11
      Member vwtool's Avatar
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      So who is more out of control, here, this kid, or the adults? His autism is partly responsible for his behavior. What condition explains ostensibly grown adults who press charges, issue warrants, handcuff and jail a ten-year old with a documented medical condition?

    12. #12
      Quote Originally Posted by vwtool View Post
      So who is more out of control, here, this kid, or the adults? His autism is partly responsible for his behavior. What condition explains ostensibly grown adults who press charges, issue warrants, handcuff and jail a ten-year old with a documented medical condition?
      This is one time I feel a good ole victim blame is in order.

      The teacher could have sued the parent or school district. But instead chose to allow this to continue. The teacher or person could have put the blame in the right spot, but didn't.

    13. #13
      Member bmann's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by fixmy59bug View Post
      For an autistic kid, extremely difficult to understand. If not impossible to understand.

      Did you watch the video?

      A lot of kids on the spectrum do not like to be touched, have their personal space invaded, and some do not like contact of any sort (verbal, eye contact, physical) with people they do not know.

      The kid was telling the police he does not like to be touched. And he was not doing it in a "GET YOUR DAMN HANDS OFF ME" sort of way, so he wasnt trying to give the police trouble.

      Even the adult was telling he was on the spectrum and did not like to be touched.

      The system failed this family in every way possible.
      I was being facetious, hence the smiley. It was a jab at the people that always side with authority no matter what the circumstance.
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    14. #14
      Geriatric Member BRealistic's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by BetterByDesign View Post
      What is a paraprofessional and why can't you kick one if you're 10?
      Kicking is only allowed in Paraprofessional Cage Matches.
      "Sometimes, I have a sudden urge to fart on this chair."

    15. #15
      Member VDubby18's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by BetterByDesign View Post
      What is a paraprofessional and why can't you kick one if you're 10?

      I am sure he'll grow up without any issues or predjudice towards authority now.

      The paras are the aids at my school. Not certified teachers but they run around the school helping with whatever, and filling in when a teacher is called to a meeting or whatever.

      I'm an elementary teacher and had an autistic student in my gen ed room. He was removed from my room to a more specialized unit, but it was plenty interesting on many days. He was basically shadowed by a sped teacher the whole time at school, and even then there were many issues with physically going after other students over little things, such as they had a pencil that he wanted. Lots of climbing on top of desks, running around the halls in the school, climbing on stuff in the room, etc.

      We've had a few incidents of students hitting teachers at my school, but nothing involving the police ever happened. Once was when a teacher was breaking up a fight in 5th grade, and twice was with my autistic student.

      Edit: Oh, and another sped student of mine who as removed due to hitting another teacher who was in my room. My school uses the co-teach model for sped, so I have several in my class.
      Last edited by VDubby18; 04-21-2017 at 10:08 PM.

    16. #16
      Geriatric Member BRealistic's Avatar
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      ^

      I used to know a guy that bitched endlessly about big government and wasted taxes...
      But then threatened to sue because his poor county school system didn't have everything his Extreme Special Needs child required.
      I never even tried to mention how contradictory that was
      He wanted government to save money, but then expected the entire school system to set up a special curriculum with special staff for his one child.

      *Special needs kids are a very delicate topic.
      On the one hand, what's best for the special needs child should be a priority.
      But then is it really a smart use of finite resources?
      Most special needs kids stay dependent for their entire lives.
      You are not educating kids to become working adults.
      "Sometimes, I have a sudden urge to fart on this chair."

    17. #17
      Member VDubby18's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      ^

      I used to know a guy that bitched endlessly about big government and wasted taxes...
      But then threatened to sue because his poor county school system didn't have everything his Extreme Special Needs child required.
      I never even tried to mention how contradictory that was
      He wanted government to save money, but then expected the entire school system to set up a special curriculum with special staff for his one child.

      *Special needs kids are a very delicate topic.
      On the one hand, what's best for the special needs child should be a priority.
      But then is it really a smart use of finite resources?
      Most special needs kids stay dependent for their entire lives.
      You are not educating kids to become working adults.
      The money was a very interesting thing in my mind. The district was paying regular teacher salary, in this case at least $53,000 (for a new teacher), to shadow one single student. It ultimately came down to how often physical altercations happened with other students, and how often the student disrupted the learning environment of the classroom. When one student in a class of 19 constantly stops others from learning then that's a good way to get the district's attention.

      The parents said they were thinking about going out of the public school system, but that's not really an option for many people (or them come to find out) because it would either cost a boat load of money, or other schools such as private and charter cannot dedicate the time or resources that the public school system can to our sped population. My district tried for 2 years, in first and second grade, to keep this student in the gen ed room, but ultimately it didn't work out. Hopefully the new classroom can teach him how to manage himself better so that he may come back into the gen ed setting later on in school.

    18. #18
      Member atomicalex's Avatar
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      Private schools typically don't want the hassle. A friend of DonL and I just had to move to a new school district to get support for their daughter. THEY HAD TO MOVE. No private school would touch her IED and the local public schools wanted to send her to what amounted to reform school. Now they are in a better disctrict that is open to the IED and not stressed about it. Daughter is in a gifted program with a parapro and doing well. Parents got a nice newer house, too.
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    19. #19
      Senior Member @McMike's Avatar
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      This reminds me of the United Airlines incident - So many things went wrong and any of them could have kept this out of the news.

      If the teacher can not handle this child: either the child is in the wrong program or the teacher is in the wrong program.

      They should have:
      1. Taken a deep breath
      2. Removed the kid from class.
      3. Called the parents.
      4. Send the kid home.
      5. Figured out if the kid or the teacher was in the wrong place
      6. Fix #5


      I have no experience whatsoever with any of this. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

    20. #20
      Geriatric Member BRealistic's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
      Private schools typically don't want the hassle. A friend of DonL and I just had to move to a new school district to get support for their daughter. THEY HAD TO MOVE. No private school would touch her IED and the local public schools wanted to send her to what amounted to reform school. Now they are in a better disctrict that is open to the IED and not stressed about it. Daughter is in a gifted program with a parapro and doing well. Parents got a nice newer house, too.
      That's great that they were able to move for their child.
      I wonder if maybe counties/districts should combine SPED kids so they can help them with a combined budget and possible less cost per "student".
      Honestly, I wouldn't know what to do if I had a child needing SPED.
      Many parents probably use school as an escape from the constant supervision required.
      "Sometimes, I have a sudden urge to fart on this chair."

    21. #21
      Member VDubby18's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      That's great that they were able to move for their child.
      I wonder if maybe counties/districts should combine SPED kids so they can help them with a combined budget and possible less cost per "student".
      Honestly, I wouldn't know what to do if I had a child needing SPED.
      Many parents probably use school as an escape from the constant supervision required.
      A lot of districts use inclusion based models for SPED now. Research has shown that a lot of SPED students (obviously there's a very general term) grow much more when placed around "normal" students, and SPED teachers will push into the classroom to either help out, or to co-teach with the regular teacher as SPED teachers are certified teachers. My school also has a CARE unit, which is a program of Children with Autism and Related Exceptionalities. The student I had at the beginning of the year was high functioning autistic.

      You'll still find self-contained SPED classrooms but they're used less and less these days. My district is fairly large with around 27,000 students, and there are self-contained SPED classes but it's generally for highly autistic, emotionally disturbed, or students with down syndrome, etc. Things to where they need constant supervision beyond what can be put into a gen ed classroom.