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    1. #26
      Senior Member dunhamjr's Avatar
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      nice ride.

      funny enough, and i do like lambos... but i have no idea which model this is.

      they just all look the same to me anymore.
      epitome
      Mr. Money Mustache

      2.0 TDI "BHW" engine partout - @tdiclub @vwvortex

    2. #27
      Member BostonB6's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by dunhamjr View Post
      nice ride.

      funny enough, and i do like lambos... but i have no idea which model this is.

      they just all look the same to me anymore.
      Reventon. 20 copies sold. One additional produced for the Lambo Museum.
      RIP BostonMk4
      4,290 posts
      Join Date: October 4, 2000

    3. #28
      Senior Member dunhamjr's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by BostonB6 View Post
      Reventon. 20 copies sold. One additional produced for the Lambo Museum.


      Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
      epitome
      Mr. Money Mustache

      2.0 TDI "BHW" engine partout - @tdiclub @vwvortex

    4. #29
      Member taurus's Avatar
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      Shouldn't those rear air ducts on top of the fenders be in the down position? Unless the engine's running or something. They move, right?
      Karl · '97 Golf VR6

    5. #30
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      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      That's the joke. Rich people in California are notorious tax evaders. They have more money than anyone, yet find more ways to skip out on taxes than anyone too.
      I actually don't blame them, you know what the taxes are on that car just to get a plate at the CA DMV.

      http://www.autotrader.com/car-news/h...-plates-256721

    6. #31
      Member Elite_Deforce's Avatar
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      I love how this turned out to be an uglier Aventador, basically.
      Quote Originally Posted by Elite_Deforce View Post
      Panache, bruh.
      Quote Originally Posted by Ernie McCracken View Post
      I don't trust the judgment of anyone who likes black wheels.
      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      I find it ironic that long time Euro brand fans would assume long term reliability issues would destroy any love of a unique product.

    7. #32
      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      That's the joke. Rich people in California are notorious tax avoiders. They have more money than anyone, yet find more ways to skip out on taxes than anyone too.
      FTFY evasion is illegal. Avoidance is encouraged.

    8. #33
      Quote Originally Posted by tbvvw View Post
      I actually don't blame them, you know what the taxes are on that car just to get a plate at the CA DMV.

      http://www.autotrader.com/car-news/h...-plates-256721
      This exact car is actually shown in the article too.

    9. #34
      Quote Originally Posted by Sold Over Sticker View Post
      It's so ugly and yet I don't hate it. Odd. I rather like the absurdity of the whole thing.
      That's how I feel about every Lamborghini made after 1977.

      Just don't make me drive it
      Want even more hushypushy? Automotive photography and journalism for the sophisticated gearhead: Star Road. [Updated 4/7]

    10. #35
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      Quote Originally Posted by surefooted View Post
      FTFY evasion is illegal. Avoidance is encouraged.
      Well no... in most places, CA included, the law requires you to register your car in the state where you reside and the car is used. If someone decided to report this guy he'll wish he had just paid the registration fees.

    11. #36
      Carbon fiber on the dash.. do not want.






      Quote Originally Posted by RS-SIX View Post
      You guys are missing the point with manuals...not only does not one want to drive a manual, many active safety systems do not work with manual transmissions. Soon manual trans cars are going to be the most dangerous cars on the road. If they dont die a natural death, they will be outlawed.

    12. #37
      Member smoothsix's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by KevinC View Post
      I think you have it backwards - he lives in OC but drove to Montana to license the thing, rather than pay the usual California fees & taxes.
      FTFY.
      I'm not rich, but somehow I manage. Sales tax+simple reg fees. No crazy personal property tax like in some states.

      Don't get me wrong, I understand he saved more in taxes than I've paid for cars in my life, but that's a personal choice.
      Quote Originally Posted by Dravenport View Post
      this thread is a mess, I can't tell if it's full of trolls or idiots and I'm not sure it matters

    13. #38
      Member VadGTI's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Robin View Post
      Well no... in most places, CA included, the law requires you to register your car in the state where you reside and the car is used. If someone decided to report this guy he'll wish he had just paid the registration fees.
      20 days in CA.

      Also, if anyone is interested, here is the CHP form for reporting such things: https://www.chp.ca.gov/notify-chp/ch...ion-violators)

      Leonardo - Team Post-Killing Ninja
      Fizzy - Team My Little Pony
      #FREEPATRIKMAN
      Quote Originally Posted by Jrod511 View Post
      If I could do one thing with a DeLorean it would be to give Vad's parents a condom.
      Quote Originally Posted by Sledge View Post
      Do you want to be known as the guy who makes worse automotive decisions than VadGTI?

    14. #39
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      Quote Originally Posted by VadGTI View Post
      20 days in CA.

      Also, if anyone is interested, here is the CHP form for reporting such things: https://www.chp.ca.gov/notify-chp/ch...ion-violators)

      That is a useful link, saved

    15. #40
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      Isn't it whichever place you spend the majority of your time? Or is it just where you decide to make your legal residence? I know a billionaire that spends over half his time in Texas and I was told it was for tax reasons.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    16. #41
      Member Turbo Benzina!'s Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by sandjunkie View Post
      Here is the photo shoot that made the car famous


      In for Tornado.

      Also, the dash alone is better than the exterior.
      This is not the prettiest thing to come out of Sant'Agata Bolognese.

    17. #42
      Senior Member bzcat's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by VadGTI View Post
      20 days in CA.

      Also, if anyone is interested, here is the CHP form for reporting such things: https://www.chp.ca.gov/notify-chp/ch...ion-violators)

      I've use that website many times

    18. #43
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      Quote Originally Posted by MartyMcFly88MPH View Post
      Isn't it whichever place you spend the majority of your time? Or is it just where you decide to make your legal residence? I know a billionaire that spends over half his time in Texas and I was told it was for tax reasons.
      I'm pretty sure it's where the car spends its time. The purpose being that the taxes on your car pay for upkeep on the roads and bridges you use, the fire/police/EMT guys who show up when your C&C exit burnout ends up in a crowd, and a bunch of other stuff. Splitting your time 50/50 is totally fine.. I actually did that for a long time but switched to VA permanently when I stopped going back and forth to FL and kept my cars in VA all year. Point is, as far as Montana is concerned it's perfectly legal to register anything you want there. However, the laws in the state where you live and keep these vehicles are probably much different, making this illegal and about as tacky as the Reventon's bolt-on carbon fiber wheel covers.

    19. #44
      Quote Originally Posted by Robin View Post
      Well no... in most places, CA included, the law requires you to register your car in the state where you reside and the car is used.
      It's an unsettled area of the law and there are a lot of nuances that vary from state to state. You're absolutely right if the car is owned and registered by an individual. But it's a gray area if the car is owned and registered by a business that is incorporated in another state and that corporation just lets the individual use the car.

      John Draneas has written a bunch of articles over the years exploring these subjects.

      How to Avoid Sales Tax-Legally
      March 1, 2009
      How to Avoid Sales Tax-Legally
      Written by John Draneas

      Five states do not levy sales taxes-Alaska, Delaware, Montana, New Hampshire, and Oregon. Oregon is the winner here

      Ever feel like you’re being taxed to death? Everyone feels that way on April 15, but another way to feel the pinch is to buy a collector car and stop by your local DMV to get it licensed.

      Consider a hypothetical SCMer taxpayer. He finds the right Ferrari Daytona coupe owned by a motivated seller. After modest negotiations (and thorough pre-purchase inspections by Ferrari experts to confirm its authenticity, history, and mechanical, body, chassis and cosmetic condition), he writes a check for $250,000. A few days later, he drives the Daytona to his nearest DMV office, and collapses when he gets the registration bill.

      If our taxpayer lives in San Francisco, he’s facing one of the highest sales taxes in the country. California’s base sales tax rate is 7.25%, but local governments and special districts are allowed to add to that. As a result of the add-ons, the sales tax rate in San Francisco is 8.5%, which adds $21,250 to the cost of the Daytona. Granted, this is a lot more than the typical state’s 6%, but it’s not even the highest sales tax rate in California. That honor goes to the city of Southgate, in Los Angeles County, which tops out at a whopping 9.25%.

      And the expenses don’t stop there. California’s annual vehicle licensing fee is 0.65% of a car’s value, adding another $1,625 to the cost of our taxpayer’s Ferrari. But California is in a deep budget mess. At this writing, a news report claimed that a tentative budget deal would raise this fee to 2% of the car’s value. That would cost our taxpayer another $5,000 every year.

      There are no limits to these taxes, and the same percentages apply to all collector cars, and they mount up as the value of the car goes up. As you would expect, our taxpayer would love to know how to avoid some or all of these additional taxes.
      Use tax backs up sales tax

      Sales taxes are levied only in retail transactions. The seller collects the sales tax from the buyer and sends it to the state. But it’s too burdensome to require private sellers to do that. So every state that imposes a sales tax backs it up with a use tax.

      In private transactions, the purchaser is legally required to report the purchase and pay a use tax, which is levied at the same rate as the sales tax. Obviously, very few purchasers bother to do that, and use tax revenue is dramatically limited. But use tax is very easily collected when licensing the vehicle.
      Dealers have their own snags

      Sales and use taxes are not imposed on wholesale transactions. Car dealer purchases are exempt, as they will collect a sales tax from the retail purchaser of the car. Some car collectors have discovered they can get licensed as a car dealer rather inexpensively. Dealer status allows them to exempt their purchases from sales and use tax, but it has its shortcomings.

      First off, dealer status makes your car insurance more difficult. Your “inventory” can’t be properly insured under a consumer policy, and sneaking it may allow the insurance company to deny your claim on the basis of fraud, just when you need the coverage most.

      As a dealer, you have to collect sales tax and file reports with the state when you sell a car, creating an administrative burden and accounting expense.

      But the greatest financial concern is that dealer status can make you lose out on capital gains taxation when you sell the car. Sales from a dealer’s inventory are taxed as ordinary income, currently a 35% maximum tax rate. That is a lot more than the bargain basement 15% federal capital gains rate, previously reported by “Legal Files.”

      It’s a pretty easy audit issue for the IRS. “Mr. Taxpayer, we know you wouldn’t lie to your state government about your sales and use tax status-that would be a crime. If you had purchased this vehicle for investment purposes, you would have paid sales or use tax. You didn’t do that, so it must be inventory, right?”

      And try getting the auditor to believe that you bought the Daytona as inventory, but later decided to keep it as an investment, and didn’t realize that doing so meant you had to pay use tax to your state.


      Find a tax shelter state

      If our taxpayer is willing to do it, he can avoid the sales and use tax by parking his Daytona in another state, at least for a while. California law, which is probably typical, imposes a sales or use tax only on cars purchased for use within the state. That is, California can’t tax the Daytona until it comes into California. Think of it this way. If you owned a vacation home in another state and bought a car to leave there for use when you stayed at your vacation home, no one would expect California to levy a tax on a car registered in the other state.

      Yacht owners have been doing this for years. It is fairly common practice for California yacht owners to take delivery of their yachts at the Ensenada, Mexico, yacht harbor and leave them there long enough to escape California sales tax. But leaving the Daytona in Mexico isn’t very appealing for many reasons, and our taxpayer would prefer to keep it in the United States. But just placing it in another state will expose it to sales or use tax in that state. There may be some savings because California has a very high sales tax rate, but it isn’t a complete victory. What our taxpayer needs is a tax haven state for his Daytona.

      There are five states that do not levy sales taxes-Alaska, Delaware, Montana, New Hampshire, and Oregon. Oregon is the winner here because it has very appealing vehicle registration laws. Under Oregon law, you can register your Daytona in Oregon if you are a resident of Oregon, or if the Daytona is garaged in and used in Oregon. In other words, the Daytona can be registered in Oregon if it is an Oregon resident, no matter where you live. And, to make it even more alluring, your initial Oregon title and licensing fees, regardless of value, come out to about $120, and that licenses the car for two years.
      You can go home again

      This may seem rather far-fetched, but it’s really quite doable. All our taxpayer needs to do is find a place to store the Daytona in Oregon, and a local contact, and he can avoid the California taxes and license fees altogether. And having a car to drive in Oregon enables him to enjoy great roads and scenery-and the tax savings can pay for plane trips back and forth.

      But at some point, our taxpayer is going to want to bring the Ferrari home to California. Can he ever afford to do so?

      California law is quite helpful in this regard. No sales or use tax is imposed when a California resident imports a car that he owned, licensed, and used in another state. To prevent subterfuges, two requirements are imposed: (1) the car must have been registered in the other state for at least 90 days (until recently, the requirement was one year); and (2) the owner must have actually used the car in the other state throughout its stay. Just parking it there for a few days won’t be enough. Our taxpayer will need gas receipts, airfare and lodging expense receipts, etc., to establish that he actually used the Daytona in Oregon throughout the 90-day period.


      Out-of-the-box thinking

      This may seem like a complicated solution, but “Legal Files” has assisted several collectors in legitimately avoiding sales and use taxes in this manner, the more notable ones involving a Porsche Carrera GT and a McLaren F1. At those levels, the savings can run into six figures.

      The Pacific Northwest is a great place to visit, and the roads and scenery are fantastic. You can take advantage of upcoming car club events to plan your local usage. Then, after your Oregon-resident collector car has been properly “seasoned,” you can work on getting it into your home state in a nontaxable manner.
      How to Avoid Sales Tax, Part II
      May 1, 2009
      How to Avoid Sales Tax, Part II
      Written by John Draneas

      A better alternative for Californians may be the use of a Montana business entity, because Montana would allow a legal, tax-free registration of the car

      The March 2009 “Legal Files” regarding sales tax triggered two helpful responses from attorneys, which suggested the need for a follow-up on this subject of great interest to car collectors.

      It’s not worth going to jail

      Excellent advice came from Jon Ash, a Bend, Oregon, attorney with 37 years of experience in criminal law:

      “I read your article with interest. It brought back memories of a federal investigation I was involved in which resulted in the indictment of my client and other upper-echelon employees of an RV company located here in Oregon. This particular dealer was billed as the largest RV dealer in the United States, promising no taxes if a purchase was made from their organization. The theory was similar to your article-buy an RV, license it in Oregon, and you were good to go. The sales people went so far as to let the buyers register the RVs at their or their family members’ addresses. The problems came when the RV owners took their vehicles back to their home states and their neighbors were offended by the tax dodge and turned them in. Several people were convicted of tax fraud and conspiracy and sentenced to jail time.”
      Montana is better than you think

      Another helpful counterpoint came from John Bennett, a Missoula, Montana, attorney with extensive experience licensing valuable collector cars:

      “I read your article with interest, but would note that it contains an error in that, last October, California changed the ’90-day rule’ back to the same ‘one-year resident’ and ‘six-month non-resident’ rules as previously in effect.

      “The ‘one-year resident’ rule requires a vehicle purchaser who is a California resident to take delivery of the vehicle outside of California and use (or use and store) the vehicle outside of California for the first twelve months following purchase before being able to register it in California without paying use tax.

      “I would argue that a better alternative for Californians, and possibly others, may be the use of a Montana business entity to take title to a car, because Montana would allow a legal, tax-free registration of the car in Montana.

      “Also, in the case of a California resident, the Montana entity creates a lower burden by means of the ‘six-month non-resident’ rule. If the vehicle is purchased by a non-resident of California (the California State Board of Equalization has acknowledged that a Montana business entity with no nexus to California is a ‘non resident’) and is used/stored outside of California up to six months during the first twelve-month period following delivery, then it can be registered, use-tax-free, in California after twelve months. This is better because the use of a Montana LLC allows the car to be legally registered in Montana and legally driven in California for up to six of the first twelve months following delivery.

      “Oregon, as a state without a sales/use tax, is an excellent state to store the car, but Oregon doesn’t allow an Oregon ‘holding company’ to register/title a car in Oregon.

      “Please also note that a vehicle, such as a collector car, can be registered in Montana for no more than $254 per year, and if the car is more than ten years old, can generally be permanently registered (one-time fee which registers the car until its ownership is transferred) for $126.

      “As you’ve already probably guessed, my office has successfully assisted many clients to take advantage of Montana’s laws.”
      Make up your minds

      Alas, Bennett is correct about California law. The boat magazines carrying articles about how to skip tax by parking your boat in Ensenada for 90 days were still on the newsstands when the California legislature changed the law back to the old one-year rule. But the discussion in “Legal Files” is otherwise reliable. It’s just that you will have to drive more of Oregon’s beautiful roads during the twelve months in which you must keep your car out of California.
      Three states’ laws to worry about

      On a broader note, the comments from Ash and Bennett point out that, if you are going to skate this maze, there are potentially three states whose laws you have to deal with-the state that titles the car, the state where the car resides, and your home state. Think of these as three separate steps.

      First step is you have to get the car titled and registered. As pointed out, Oregon is a helpful haven if the car resides in Oregon, but it won’t work well if the car doesn’t reside there. Montana is easier to work with in that regard. If you form a Montana business entity (say, a Montana LLC) to own the car, Montana will title and register the car no matter where it might be. It is relatively inexpensive to form a Montana LLC and, as Bennett points out, the Montana registration fees are quite reasonable. And, although Montana requires a physical VIN verification, you can get that from an appropriate officer in any state-the car does not have to go to Montana to be inspected.

      Second, you have to park the car somewhere. If it’s in the same state where it is registered, there’s no problem. But if you want to store it elsewhere, you have to comply with that state’s laws. Most states have a relatively short window (often as little as 30 days) before the car is required to be registered in that state, which will trigger sales/use tax if the state has one. The clearest course is to title and register it in either Oregon, in your own name, or in Montana, using an LLC, and leave it in that state.

      Third, you have to comply with your state’s law when you bring the car home. To avoid paying a use tax at that point, you will have to “season” the car by leaving it in the state where it is titled long enough to meet your state’s requirements. If you use Oregon as your host state and you live in California, that will mean leaving it in Oregon for twelve months. The Montana LLC relaxes that a bit by giving you the six-out-of-twelve-month option, which still requires a total of twelve months but allows you to drive it in California for up to six of those twelve months, although not consecutively. Note that California would apply the same six-out-of-twelve-month rule with an Oregon LLC, but Oregon would require that the LLC’s principal place of business be in Oregon, whereas Montana wouldn’t care. If you live in a state other than California, it will have similar rules, and you need to learn what they are.

      Bennett is correct that Montana can be more attractive than Oregon in certain circumstances. In the end, however, the choice boils down to which state you want to leave the car parked in and, in the special case of California, whether the six-of-twelve rule makes a difference to you. And, Oregon treats RVs differently; for them, use a Montana LLC.


      No perfect answer

      There are some significant limitations to all of this. If your plan is to bring the car to your home state, using a haven state may avoid the use tax, but once you bring the car “home” you will have to start paying your state’s annual licensing fees, which can be as much as 2% of the car’s value each year. Simply stated, there is no legal way to keep the car registered in another state while you are regularly driving it in your home state.

      And that brings us back to the point made by Jon Ash. Being caught cheating can have serious repercussions. If neighbors become jealous about a wealthy car collector avoiding vehicle taxes they pay every year, it’s not uncommon for them to make a phone call to the authorities. And going to jail is no fun, no matter how nice the cars you have parked at home are. Consequently, if you’re going to go this route, make sure you do it the right way.
      Other States Sniping at Montana’s Magic Bullet
      July 1, 2012
      Other States Sniping at Montana’s Magic Bullet
      Written by John Draneas, Dale Spradling and John Bennett

      “Legal Files” has written several times about various techniques that collectors employ to avoid paying sales/use taxes on their collector cars. It’s a big deal, as the sales/use tax rates are typically 6% to 10% of the purchase price of the car.

      One of the common techniques, which our office uses with many of our clients, is to form a Montana LLC (limited liability company) to serve as the owner of the collector cars. Under Montana law, a business entity formed in Montana can title and register its vehicles in Montana no matter where they might be located. The titling and registration fees are minimal, and Montana does not have a sales tax.

      Think of the Montana LLC as Step One in the process — it gives you a valid title and license plates, which is useful when it comes to selling the car later and easily transferring title. If that is all you are looking for, then there is nothing else to worry about, and this approach works perfectly well.

      But if you are going to drive your Montana-registered cars within your home state, the next question that arises is whether you will encounter problems with the out-of-state plates. Think of that as Step Two in the process. Generally, all states have laws that require that their residents title and register their cars in their state within some specified time after they first bring the car into the state. And, when they do that, the state DMV will collect the sales/use tax. So, the Step Two question is, can you keep driving the car with Montana plates because the Montana LLC owns it and is not a resident of your home state — or do you now have to register it in your home state?


      A changing landscape
      Dale Spradling, a Texas CPA and accounting professor who has dealt with this issue in Texas and other states, contacted “Legal Files” to report that there have been some recent developments in several states that question the viability of this approach. Spradling says:
      The states are fighting back. They believe a Montana LLC which owns nothing but vehicles is little more than a shell that should be ignored for sales tax purposes. So, when one of their state residents, who also happens to own a Montana LLC, starts driving a car titled in the LLC’s name over their state roads, they want him to pay up.

      These states are getting aggressive because they think that abuses involving motor homes have started to reach epidemic proportions (although the principles apply equally to collector cars). An Internet search of “Montana llc rv” yields over 2.5 million hits and a page full of sites that address avoiding sales tax with Montana LLCs.

      Massachusetts snooped around Montana public records and collected $200,000 from 23 targeted cases. California has launched a rewards program for residents to turn in their neighbors. And Colorado launched a major enforcement action, collecting $2.7 million in unpaid taxes and convicting 12 Colorado residents of misdemeanor tax evasion.

      Because Montana allows anonymous ownership, these states have become very aggressive in piercing the ownership veil. They are stopping vehicles with Montana plates, trolling chat boards, tracing title changes, subpoenaing banks, and setting up whistleblower hot lines to find Montana LLCs owned by their state residents.

      Sales and use taxes are based upon residency. If you are a state resident who owns a vehicle used on your state’s highways, your state’s law will require you to register your vehicle there and pay sales/use tax. Once you cross the state line, you have to register. However, most states allow a grace period, typically 30–90 days.

      Nonresidents driving a car for personal use do not have a time limit for how long they can use their car on state highways, so long as they remain nonresidents. But if they start making money or otherwise putting down roots, they can become a resident and have to register.

      Thus, the key is residency. Your home state doesn’t care how Montana treats your LLC. All that matters is whether you are a resident and who owns the car. If your Montana LLC is the registered owner of the car, not you, are you then free to use your state’s highways?
      Today, a growing number of states are “looking through” the Montana LLC to treat you as the equitable owner of the car. Citing various federal income tax rulings, they make a “substance over form” argument that when there is no business purpose for your Montana LLC, you, as the LLC owner, are the true owner of the car and are required to register it and pay the sales/use tax.

      Will using federal income tax cases to look through a legally formed Montana LLC hold water in your state court? Who knows? Meanwhile, you can bet that the lack of any definitive rulings will not stop your state regulators from shaking this tree because, as my grandfather used to say, “Life is not fair.”


      Counterpoint from Montana
      “Legal Files” ran these developments by John Bennett, a Montana attorney who regularly forms Montana LLCs for this purpose, and with whom “Legal Files” has worked many times. Bennett responds:
      My law office looks for exemptions from a state’s sales/use tax statute that offer a “safe harbor” if the vehicle spends that amount of time out of state. Some states have well-defined exclusionary periods, and some don’t. Texas law is unclear, but may provide an exemption if a vehicle is used or stored outside of Texas for a year or more. We have had clients purchase vehicles, and use them outside of Texas for more than the one-year period, who then re-register them in Texas without being asked to pay the use tax, although it is unknown what the Texas Comptroller’s Office would think. Unfortunately, until a case is litigated, we won’t know.

      Many of our clients are members of an RV club based in Texas. Many of the club’s 32,000 members join in order to become legal residents of Texas, a state with no income tax. Many also spend little, or no, time in Texas, and are therefore good candidates to use a Montana LLC to own a vehicle or vehicles which will then be used outside of Texas.

      In contrast, California’s exemption from its use tax is clear — if the LLC is predominantly owned by a California resident, the vehicle must be out of state for the first year; if owned by a non-resident, then it must be out of state for a majority of the first year. Massachusetts law exempts vehicles out of state for the first six months or more. In Colorado, it is one year, although it is unclear if you have to stay out of Colorado for all or just most of the year.


      Putting it all together
      Law is not an exact science. Spradling disagrees with Bennett that Texas has a “one-year loophole.” He also believes that Texas will use the “look-through” theory to ignore a Montana LLC and instead tax the Texas resident LLC owner as soon as he brings the vehicle across the state line into the Lone Star State.

      Spradling, Bennett and “Legal Files” all agree that, if you use a Montana LLC to own your collector car and you never drive the car in your home state, you won’t have to worry about sales/use tax. Your state can’t tax you because the car is not present there. The states where you use the car can’t tax you because you aren’t a resident there.

      We also agree on Bennett’s prime point, that a Montana LLC can be helpful when your plan is to use the car out of state long enough to meet your state’s safe harbor time, and you then can bring in the car tax-free (for example, after one year in California).

      However, many states do not provide any such safe harbor, so it’s an open question. And some, Louisiana and Kentucky, for example, charge a use tax but allow a credit for any sales tax paid to another state. Since you didn’t pay any to Montana, this won’t work for you in those states.

      The key problem area is where you use a Montana LLC and drive your car in your home state anyway without having met an out-of-state use exception. Although you have a valid Montana plate, it isn’t necessarily any sort of magic safety shield.

      Spradling points out that several states have taken aggressive positions on using federal income tax principles to look through the LLC to treat you as the real owner of the car, and then applying their laws to force you to title the car in your home state.

      Whether the states can really do that can easily be debated, but the real question is whether you want to be the one to bear the cost (likely $25,000 to $75,000 in legal fees) — and run the risk of criminal prosecution — to prove that the Montana LLC is the magic bullet that saves you from the tax man.

      JOHN DRANEAS is an attorney in Oregon. His comments are general in nature and are not intended to substitute for consultation with an attorney.
      Current: 2016 Volvo XC90 - 2010 Volvo XC70 - 1991 Mazda Miata :: 2000 Aprilia RS50 - 1972 Honda CB350
      Past: 2013 Mercedes-Benz GLK350 - 2013 Volkswagen GTI - 2007 BMW 335i - 1988 BMW 635CSi - 1987 Volkswagen Jetta GLI - 1987 Suzuki Samurai - 1984 BMW 633CSi :: 1992 Kawasaki KDX200 - 1983 Yamaha YZ80

    20. #45
      Quote Originally Posted by tbvvw View Post
      I actually don't blame them, you know what the taxes are on that car just to get a plate at the CA DMV.

      http://www.autotrader.com/car-news/h...-plates-256721

      Treasure State lol.

      More like Treasure Plate
      call it potatography

    21. #46
      Hey look, it's a Reventon!

      But wait, let's talk tax evasion instead.

    22. #47
      Member Avus's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by sandjunkie View Post
      Here is the photo shoot that made the car famous

      Tornado is really not fit to "pair" Reventon. F-117 Nighthawk is a much better fit...
      “I am not a Mac user unless under duress.” - John Carmack

    23. #48
      Quote Originally Posted by StressStrain View Post
      Hey look, it's a Reventon!

      But wait, let's talk tax avoidance instead.
      FTFY
      Current: 2016 Volvo XC90 - 2010 Volvo XC70 - 1991 Mazda Miata :: 2000 Aprilia RS50 - 1972 Honda CB350
      Past: 2013 Mercedes-Benz GLK350 - 2013 Volkswagen GTI - 2007 BMW 335i - 1988 BMW 635CSi - 1987 Volkswagen Jetta GLI - 1987 Suzuki Samurai - 1984 BMW 633CSi :: 1992 Kawasaki KDX200 - 1983 Yamaha YZ80

    24. #49
      I feel perfectly comfortable talking about other people's tax ploys. For the most part they seem proud of them too.

      With the plate front and center in the photo, are we expected not to talk about it?
      call it potatography

    25. #50
      Quote Originally Posted by turbo_nine View Post
      With the plate front and center in the photo, are we expected not to talk about it?
      I expected that an automotive forum would find the Lamborghini more interesting than outing tax avoiders.

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