Lowest treadwear rating (OE tires) - Page 2
Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    Welcome to VWvortex - The Volkswagen Enthusiast Website.
    You're currently browsing VWvortex site as a guest. Please sign up or sign in and take part in the conversation. VWvortex has over 750,000+ registered users discussing a wide variety of Volkswagen related topics. Take a minute to sign up to enjoy all the features of VWvortex.
    The Car Lounge
    Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
    Results 26 to 50 of 52
    1. #26
      Member worth_fixing's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 23rd, 2009
      Location
      Montreal, Qc
      Posts
      5,263
      I have 600 treadwear on my Bridgestone Ecopias. They barely look used since I bought my car 59,500 km ago.
      http://badges.fuelly.com/images/sig-metric/286588.png
      The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten." -Benjamin Franklin
      Kind regards,
      James

    2. #27
      Member Blade3562's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 17th, 2012
      Location
      Garfield Heights, OH
      Posts
      2,989
      My golf came with Conti Pro Contacts which have a treadwear of 500. That seems impossible they didn't even last 20k miles. My friends Altima came on them as well and they were toast in less than 25k.

      http://www.continentaltire.com/produ...-p19565r15-89h

    3. #28
      Member GolfTango's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 15th, 2001
      Location
      Not Fancy, CT
      Posts
      10,243
      Quote Originally Posted by Blade3562 View Post
      My golf came with Conti Pro Contacts which have a treadwear of 500. That seems impossible they didn't even last 20k miles. My friends Altima came on them as well and they were toast in less than 25k.

      http://www.continentaltire.com/produ...-p19565r15-89h
      That's what's on the Accord.

    4. #29
      Member Elite_Deforce's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 18th, 2012
      Location
      Montreal, Quebec
      Posts
      7,537
      Wow, I thought the 220 TW on my P Zeros was bad.
      Quote Originally Posted by Elite_Deforce View Post
      Panache, bruh.
      Quote Originally Posted by Ernie McCracken View Post
      I don't trust the judgment of anyone who likes black wheels.
      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      I find it ironic that long time Euro brand fans would assume long term reliability issues would destroy any love of a unique product.

    5. #30
      Member Blade3562's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 17th, 2012
      Location
      Garfield Heights, OH
      Posts
      2,989
      Quote Originally Posted by GolfTango View Post
      That's what's on the Accord.
      I know it's OT from the thread, but with those tires I got around 5-10mpg better than on my 18s

    6. #31
      Member helement2003's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 2nd, 2004
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      6,792
      Quote Originally Posted by cournot View Post
      G37S coupes had Bridgestone RE050As with 140 TW. Ugh.
      These were also found on a bunch of Japanese sports/sporty cars (350Zs, and I believe non-CR S2000s).

      These came on my 2008.5 Mazdaspeed3. Great tires, but yes they wear fast. If I remember correctly, I believe I got 15k out of them?
      My Flickr Stream // 2008 R32 #138 // 2013 Chevy Volt // 2017 Chevy Volt

    7. #32
      Member BUJonathan's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 2nd, 2004
      Location
      Chicagoland, IL
      Posts
      2,896
      Quote Originally Posted by Sledge View Post
      If the tires truly are built to an ASTM spec, they should be fairly consistent between manufacturers.
      Minor clarification: The ASTM tire is the reference tire, not the test tire.

      The tire under test can vary quite a bit in its actual real-world wear. First, the test is of limited scope (7,200 miles). So tires from different manufacturers may have different wear rates, and the wear rates are very likely non-linear: As the tire wears you lose mass. Less mass -> potentially higher temp -> heat cycled rubber -> harder rubber -> lower wear. However you also mitigating factors: As the tire wears, tread squirm is reduced which helps keep temps in check. To further complicate the issue, the tread size and tread compound is often intentionally varied with depth to counteract age-hardened rubber and shallower water channels. Some tires wear to larger tread blocks, some actually open up more sipes with shallower tread, some uncover softer compound rubber -- each tire mfg has their own unique design.

      Finally, the UTQG test is on a specific route, which likely isn't representative of how you or I actually drive our cars. I drive mainly on grooved concrete highways. You may drive mostly on asphalt city streets. Tires from different manufacturers will have different reaction to those drive cycles which aren't going to match up to the UTQG test cycle.

      In summary, the UTQG is only meant to show a relative increase or decrease in wear, not the absolute wear life of a tire.
      Last edited by BUJonathan; 04-20-2017 at 11:27 PM.
      =

    8. #33
      Member BUJonathan's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 2nd, 2004
      Location
      Chicagoland, IL
      Posts
      2,896
      Quote Originally Posted by worth_fixing View Post
      I have 600 treadwear on my Bridgestone Ecopias. They barely look used since I bought my car 59,500 km ago.
      I had Ecopias (EDIT: EL-400s) on my Mazda3. They would not die. At like 90k miles I replaced them because they had gotten hard and the snow traction declined... they still had a decent amount of tread left.

      I replaced them with some 700-rated Continental PureContacts, and those wore much faster. I'd be surprised if they lasted 50k or 60k miles.
      Last edited by BUJonathan; 04-21-2017 at 04:18 PM.
      =

    9. #34
      Member Tokyosmash's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 10th, 2007
      Location
      East Africa for a bit
      Posts
      3,417
      The Alfa Romeo Quadrifoglio comes with 50tw P Zeros, the Focus RS comes with 180tw Pilot Sport Cup 2's.

    10. #35
      Member
      Join Date
      Feb 15th, 2010
      Location
      Henderson Ky
      Posts
      857
      GM used to put Uniroyal Tiger Paws on their trucks, and I don't know what the number was, but it must've been high because those damn tires last forever and still looked brand new. I think I finally tossed them at 120K miles. I replaced them with Mastercrafts, and on the same truck, those didn't last two years.

      The Hankook Ventus2 Concept 2 on my Corolla are rated 500, but they're sticky as hell, wonder how they managed that.
      Last edited by Roboturner913; 04-21-2017 at 12:13 AM.

    11. #36
      Member Elite_Deforce's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 18th, 2012
      Location
      Montreal, Quebec
      Posts
      7,537
      Quote Originally Posted by Roboturner913 View Post
      The Hankook Ventus2 Concept 2 on my Corolla are rated 500, but they're sticky as hell, wonder how they managed that.
      I have the same tires on the Mazda3 and their wet performance is sh*t IMO.
      Quote Originally Posted by Elite_Deforce View Post
      Panache, bruh.
      Quote Originally Posted by Ernie McCracken View Post
      I don't trust the judgment of anyone who likes black wheels.
      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      I find it ironic that long time Euro brand fans would assume long term reliability issues would destroy any love of a unique product.

    12. #37
      Member Blade3562's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 17th, 2012
      Location
      Garfield Heights, OH
      Posts
      2,989
      Quote Originally Posted by Roboturner913 View Post
      GM used to put Uniroyal Tiger Paws on their trucks, and I don't know what the number was, but it must've been high because those damn tires last forever and still looked brand new. I think I finally tossed them at 120K miles. I replaced them with Mastercrafts, and on the same truck, those didn't last two years.

      The Hankook Ventus2 Concept 2 on my Corolla are rated 500, but they're sticky as hell, wonder how they managed that.
      That's what my 2002 Sierra had I'm 99% sure. We had to replace them at 120k in 2013 due to sidewall dry rot lol. I totally forgot about that. They weren't all highway cruising miles either; they were dirt road, city and backroad towing trailer miles! My grandpa also got a Silverado 1500 work truck that came with the same tires. He got more mileage than that out of them. They were raised white letter tires with a very plain sidewall and boring tread pattern.

    13. #38
      Member compy222's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 7th, 2005
      Location
      Pothole, Midwest
      Posts
      16,258
      corvette pilot sport cup 2's were rated at 180.
      the p zero corsa's on the 302 (and Fiats) are 60.
      Quote Originally Posted by capsaicin View Post
      AP1 S2000? I can not in good conscience talk you out of that. May your slip angle be great and your bed not be the couch!

    14. #39
      Senior Member Sporin's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 17th, 1999
      Location
      Vermont, USA
      Posts
      27,081
      We have so many threads on what tires people dislike, what all-seasons do TCL'ers actually recommend?

    15. #40
      Member Blade3562's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 17th, 2012
      Location
      Garfield Heights, OH
      Posts
      2,989
      Quote Originally Posted by Sporin View Post
      We have so many threads on what tires people dislike, what all-seasons do TCL'ers actually recommend?
      Love my BF-Goodrich G-Force Comp 2 A/S.

    16. #41
      Member compy222's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 7th, 2005
      Location
      Pothole, Midwest
      Posts
      16,258
      Quote Originally Posted by Sporin View Post
      We have so many threads on what tires people dislike, what all-seasons do TCL'ers actually recommend?
      Conti DWS typically are very well reviewed around here.
      Quote Originally Posted by capsaicin View Post
      AP1 S2000? I can not in good conscience talk you out of that. May your slip angle be great and your bed not be the couch!

    17. #42
      Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 6th, 2000
      Location
      Phoenix area
      Posts
      28,661
      If you want to compare apples to apples, compare the mileage warranty. While the tire makers can declare anything to be the "100" base tire, they do not get to use a different sized mile, like they can't say their mile is the length of a kilometer instead of a standard American mile.



      Frustratingly, Tire Rack doesn't let you see that from a glance. You have to individually select each tire separately, then further go into the details and change the tab from "Description" to "Warranty" to see how long the mileage warranty is for each tire you're interested in.

      EDIT: The above capture was just some general purpose Bridgestone. Here's the OP's Geolander in question with the 280 treadwear. It carries a 0 mile tread life warranty. So... that tells you something important, I think. Cheater tires designed to win magazine comparos, basically.

      Last edited by AZGolf; 04-21-2017 at 03:18 PM.

    18. #43
      Member adrew's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 14th, 2003
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      15,938
      Quote Originally Posted by Sporin View Post
      We have so many threads on what tires people dislike, what all-seasons do TCL'ers actually recommend?
      I have never been disappointed in any way with a set of Michelins appropriately matched to the sportiness of the car. Early on I tried other/cheaper brands -- while they are okay in most areas there's always something I end up not liking about them, like slow steering response or weird noise characteristics or bad traction in the wet.

      The Corolla is getting a set of Michelin Premier A/S when the meh/loud Continentals it came with wear out. I don't mind spending an extra $150 on my wife's car to know she can drive in bad weather with no issues.




      I had a set of Pilot Sport A/S 3 on my car before the right two got ruined and they were amazing. They are NLA in my size so now I have a set of H-rated Michelin Energys on it (summer version made in Germany, it's the base Mini tire) and it has almost a comical amount of grip, with braking improved by an order of magnitude over the rock hard, no grip OEM Goodyear Fuelmaxes (580 treadwear rating, lol).
      Last edited by adrew; 04-21-2017 at 04:02 PM.
      Improving the signal-to-noise ratio

    19. #44
      Member BUJonathan's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 2nd, 2004
      Location
      Chicagoland, IL
      Posts
      2,896
      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      If you want to compare apples to apples, compare the mileage warranty. While the tire makers can declare anything to be the "100" base tire, they do not get to use a different sized mile, like they can't say their mile is the length of a kilometer instead of a standard American mile.
      That's not true. The UTQG test uses a tire defined by ASTM E1136, which rigidly defines the "100" reference tire (size, tread pattern tread compound, etc.) and even how to measure the properties of the reference tire. You can't just reference to any random tire.

      The mileage warranty is a good indication of life... but it's just that, an indication like the UTQG rating. There's no standard for how a tire manufacturer has to set the tread life warranty. Further, the warranties are almost always pro-rated and have a lot of stipulations (proper inflation, rotation, etc.) to allow them to weasel out of paying. The consequences to the manufacturer for a tire wearing out before the warranty expires are quite low. So they can willingly sell a tire with a 60k warranty even if they know on average it will wear out by 40k miles. All they have to do is honor the terms of the pro-rated warranty.

      It would be like saying that when VW offered a 4/50 warranty, they must be more reliable, longer lasting vehicles than Toyota's because VW's warranty was longer...


      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      Frustratingly, Tire Rack doesn't let you see that from a glance. You have to individually select each tire separately, then further go into the details and change the tab from "Description" to "Warranty" to see how long the mileage warranty is for each tire you're interested in.

      EDIT: The above capture was just some general purpose Bridgestone. Here's the OP's Geolander in question with the 280 treadwear. It carries a 0 mile tread life warranty. So... that tells you something important, I think. Cheater tires designed to win magazine comparos, basically.
      Many OEM-spec tires don't carry tread life warranties. I mean, it's clear the OP's Geolanders are not meant to last a long time. But I doubt an OEM is going to care whether or not the tire they select comes with a warranty. It's not something the end customer of a new car is really going to pay extra for, so why should an OEM eat that cost? For example, the Bridgestones that were on my '12 Mazda3 lacked a tread life warranty, but I got 90,000 miles out of them...
      =

    20. #45
      Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 6th, 2000
      Location
      Phoenix area
      Posts
      28,661
      Quote Originally Posted by BUJonathan View Post
      That's not true. The UTQG test uses a tire defined by ASTM E1136, which rigidly defines the "100" reference tire (size, tread pattern tread compound, etc.) and even how to measure the properties of the reference tire. You can't just reference to any random tire.
      Fair enough. The old information that circulated on the internet said that every tire maker got to pick whatever they wanted as the reference tire.

      Quote Originally Posted by BUJonathan View Post
      Many OEM-spec tires don't carry tread life warranties. I mean, it's clear the OP's Geolanders are not meant to last a long time. But I doubt an OEM is going to care whether or not the tire they select comes with a warranty. It's not something the end customer of a new car is really going to pay extra for, so why should an OEM eat that cost? For example, the Bridgestones that were on my '12 Mazda3 lacked a tread life warranty, but I got 90,000 miles out of them...
      I would go with "it depends". For any German or luxury brand, I agree absolutely that the manufacturer couldn't care less. The reason being those cars go out on lease and are returned before the tires wear out, at which point they can put whatever tires they want on it before selling it CPO. They don't have to care about resale.

      For a Honda/Toyota or Ford/Chevy, those are bread & butter brands where people shop consumer reports and care about things like total cost of ownership. If a particular brand gets a bad reputation for putting crap tires on their vehicles, that eventually shows up on forums, in articles, or other places where savvy consumers complain about stuff that costs them money. Things that affect reputation also affect resale, which again can cost the owner money. A brand with poor resale isn't as attractive to that purchasing demographic and can lead to lower volume sales for the manufacturer.

      So basically I'd say there's only so much they can get away with on a bread & butter vehicle because those are often purchased and owned well beyond the 36k mile mark and things like the cost of replacing tires matter. Case in point: Honda and the PAX tires for the Odyssey. It was such a scandal with how expensive they were that I've seen people credit the PAX tires as one of the reasons the Odyssey quickly gathered a bad reputation, albeit it was a distant second place behind the glass transmissions that literally every Odyssey owner I've known has replaced at least twice. One of them went through 3 transmissions, all under warranty. That was undoubtedly the biggest Odyssey scandal of all time, but the PAX tires were a total failure as well.

      EDIT for source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelin_PAX_System

      Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia
      Class-action lawsuit in America

      A class-action suit against American Honda Motor Company involving the use of Michelin PAX tires was settled in December 2008. ... It appears that the major impetus for the class action was the poor tread-wear performance of the PAX tire on the Touring Edition of the third-generation Honda Odyssey minivan built for the North American market.[citation needed] The Michelin PAX system latitude LX4 tires apparently did not have the claimed lifetime, and the lack of universal repair and replacement facilities (PAX tires cannot be serviced at any tire shop, but only those with special equipment and specially trained personnel) and the cost to replace PAX tires were major factors for the class action. Rather than alleging the PAX system was defective, the suit charged that the PAX tires and special wheels were unreasonably difficult to repair or replace.[10]
      Last edited by AZGolf; 04-21-2017 at 05:16 PM.

    21. #46
      Member adrew's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 14th, 2003
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      15,938
      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      For a Honda/Toyota or Ford/Chevy, those are bread & butter brands where people shop consumer reports and care about things like total cost of ownership. If a particular brand gets a bad reputation for putting crap tires on their vehicles, that eventually shows up on forums, in articles, or other places where savvy consumers complain about stuff that costs them money. Things that affect reputation also affect resale, which again can cost the owner money. A brand with poor resale isn't as attractive to that purchasing demographic and can lead to lower volume sales for the manufacturer.
      I thought it was interesting/kind of disappointing that the new Civics come with Hankooks on a lot of trims.
      Improving the signal-to-noise ratio

    22. #47
      Member Elite_Deforce's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 18th, 2012
      Location
      Montreal, Quebec
      Posts
      7,537
      Quote Originally Posted by Sporin View Post
      We have so many threads on what tires people dislike, what all-seasons do TCL'ers actually recommend?
      Pirelli P4s are not too bad. We did not get an opportunity to see how long they would last, however.

      I am slowly reaching into the Michelin-or-nothing camp, but I still have some Hankooks to kill off first.
      Quote Originally Posted by Elite_Deforce View Post
      Panache, bruh.
      Quote Originally Posted by Ernie McCracken View Post
      I don't trust the judgment of anyone who likes black wheels.
      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      I find it ironic that long time Euro brand fans would assume long term reliability issues would destroy any love of a unique product.

    23. #48
      Member BUJonathan's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 2nd, 2004
      Location
      Chicagoland, IL
      Posts
      2,896
      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      I would go with "it depends". For any German or luxury brand, I agree absolutely that the manufacturer couldn't care less. The reason being those cars go out on lease and are returned before the tires wear out, at which point they can put whatever tires they want on it before selling it CPO. They don't have to care about resale.

      For a Honda/Toyota or Ford/Chevy, those are bread & butter brands where people shop consumer reports and care about things like total cost of ownership. If a particular brand gets a bad reputation for putting crap tires on their vehicles, that eventually shows up on forums, in articles, or other places where savvy consumers complain about stuff that costs them money. Things that affect reputation also affect resale, which again can cost the owner money. A brand with poor resale isn't as attractive to that purchasing demographic and can lead to lower volume sales for the manufacturer.
      In regards to your original post about the OP's tires having low life since they're not sold with a tread wear warranty, the OEM and replacement tire markets have different business models:

      OEMs are looking for a tire that meets their targets fuel economy (low rolling resistance), performance (steering feel, braking performance, acceleration, corning), NVH, cost, etc. As far as life, pretty much any all season tire is going to make it through a 3/36 bumper-to-bumper warranty... and a low-rolling resistance tires often inherently have even longer life. Since mainstream automakers work in a high-volume/high-competition environment, they generally want a low price. Since customers don't realistically cross-shop new cars based on tire life, a tread life warranty isn't something most OEMs want to pay for. Side note: On the back end of the deal, tire companies usually jack up the replacement price of the OEM-spec tires to recover profit, so this why the OEM tires often have higher prices than other replacement tires.

      In the replacement tire market, the typical customer already has 40k+ miles on their car by the time the OEM tires are up for replacement. That customer has often at that point decided to make a long-term commitment to the car. So, they're often willing to pay extra for a tire with a tread life warranty. However, there's no standard for what defines a "60,000 mile tire". Its a marketing tool, not necessarily a hard technical requirement. There are tires without warranties that last longer than ones with warranties. And within a given mileage class, you'll still see wildly different real world tread lives.

      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      So basically I'd say there's only so much they can get away with on a bread & butter vehicle because those are often purchased and owned well beyond the 36k mile mark and things like the cost of replacing tires matter. Case in point: Honda and the PAX tires for the Odyssey. It was such a scandal with how expensive they were that I've seen people credit the PAX tires as one of the reasons the Odyssey quickly gathered a bad reputation, albeit it was a distant second place behind the glass transmissions that literally every Odyssey owner I've known has replaced at least twice. One of them went through 3 transmissions, all under warranty. That was undoubtedly the biggest Odyssey scandal of all time, but the PAX tires were a total failure as well.

      EDIT for source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelin_PAX_System
      The PAX tires are a whole separate issue. PAX requires a proprietary wheel design with unequal diameters for the inner and outer bead.. and the PAX tires were only manufactured by Michelin. When your tires were due for replacement, you couldn't cross-shop different tire brands unless you also wanted replace the wheels. So your options were: A) Pay through the nose for PAX tires at your local dealer or the occasional tire shop who could get PAX tires. or B) Pony up even more money for new wheels so you could switch to non-PAX tires.

      Going back to the original topic, an OEM tire wearing out at say 40k miles instead of 60k miles may be annoying to a customer, but probably isn't going to show up on most customer's radars as a major issue. They can always switch to longer-life tires if that's important to them. With PAX, the replacement cost was quite high, and there were literally no alternatives for frustrated customers unless they spent even more money changing the wheels out.
      Last edited by BUJonathan; 04-21-2017 at 08:08 PM.
      =

    24. #49
      This thread made me go check the OE Bridgestone Potenzas on my IS350...



      20,000 miles on them and they've got life left. They're staggered though so I can't rotate them.

    25. #50
      Member Woodski's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 14th, 2010
      Location
      CT
      Posts
      3,360
      All of my cars have 300TW Yokohamas on them. Avid's on the Civic, s.Drives on the Volvo.

    Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast