Carlos Ghosn vows to 'tell the truth about what's happening' in twitter...let's guess what he might reveal - Page 5
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    1. #101
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      Yep, a guy who lives in mansions while buying yachts, condos etc at company expense is likely to never have broken the law. And now that he fled home arrest awaiting trial in a private jet forfeiting multi million $$$ bail (which is by itself an admission of guilt, basically) is there any questions left about whether or not he is guilty...

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    3. #102
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      Quote Originally Posted by Vladimir VR6 View Post
      Yep, a guy who lives in mansions while buying yachts, condos etc at company expense is likely to never have broken the law. And now that he fled home arrest awaiting trial in a private jet forfeiting multi million $$$ bail (which is by itself an admission of guilt, basically) is there any questions left about whether or not he is guilty...
      The answer is yes.
      Quote Originally Posted by 20aeman View Post
      No, the real enthusiast vehicle would be the RX8. It combines V12 Lamborghini gas mileage with Hyundai Genesis 4cyl. performance.

    4. #103
      Feels Like the First Time DeeJoker's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by nm+ View Post
      $9 million is pretty low for an extremely wealthy foreign national with significant assets outside of the country with 3 passports, at least two from countries that are extremely unlikely to extradite their citizens for non-violent crimes.
      My reaction as a former defense attorney was that bail as low.
      I'll defer to you on that one, you make a salient point. Is a number like that common for white collar crime here in the States? I have no point of reference except with regards to what I hear and read about violent criminals, especially newsworthy ones like Roof.

      Quote Originally Posted by Reisner
      Wow, and you wonder why the US has so many crimes and criminals, both white and blue. So many crooks in government and business and so many mass shootings. They create immense damage, only to get bailed or walk and do it again. But at least you get a movie out of it, out of misery. Yeah, dude, stay proud of your 'American sensitivities'. I don't think the Japanese would trade places with you. I'm sure they'd prefer you commit your crimes in America while they do theirs in Japan, and never shall the two cross paths.
      I don't wonder in the least.

      In spite of the corruption that can and does exist within the American government, I would rather take my chances with our judiciary than any system anywhere else. In spite of our issues, every citizen's rights are protected and watch dog groups exist and have the freedom of speech and press to ensure the government does not, for instance, detain a suspect for 23 days without charges and subject them to unreasonable search, seizure, interrogation, or illegal detention, establish excessive bail, or in the case of Ghosn, decree contact with a spouse is forbidden as a term of bail. This country was founded on the principle of due process.

      The point has been made repeatedly here and elsewhere that the Japanese judicial system does not value the rights of accused persons, innocence be damned.

      And I said "sensibilities," not "sensitivities." There is a distinct difference.
      The above post may contain opinions, coarse language, offensive terms, spelling mistakes, and/or improper grammar. You have been warned.

    5. #104
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      Quote Originally Posted by DeeJoker View Post
      I'll defer to you on that one, you make a salient point. Is a number like that common for white collar crime here in the States? I have no point of reference except with regards to what I hear and read about violent criminals, especially newsworthy ones like Roof.



      I don't wonder in the least.

      In spite of the corruption that can and does exist within the American government, I would rather take my chances with our judiciary than any system anywhere else. In spite of our issues, every citizen's rights are protected and watch dog groups exist and have the freedom of speech and press to ensure the government does not, for instance, detain a suspect for 23 days without charges and subject them to unreasonable search, seizure, interrogation, or illegal detention, establish excessive bail, or in the case of Ghosn, decree contact with a spouse is forbidden as a term of bail. This country was founded on the principle of due process.

      The point has been made repeatedly here and elsewhere that the Japanese judicial system does not value the rights of accused persons, innocence be damned.

      And I said "sensibilities," not "sensitivities." There is a distinct difference.
      Hahahahahahahahahaha. Oh bless. I love when Americans get riled up about due process, justice for all and the protection of everyone's rights. I'll just leave this right here:

      It began in February, when Guardian US, the American edition of the British daily, published the first in a series of articles questioning doings at a Chicago police detention facility known as Homan Square. Police hold and interrogate suspects at the facility, a former Sears warehouse in a predominantly black, low-income neighborhood on the city’s West Side. But it’s neither jail nor booking station. Attorney Flint Taylor described Homan to me as “an intelligence gathering place” akin to a CIA “black site.”
      .
      .
      .
      On the basis of internal Chicago police records, the Guardian‘s Spencer Ackerman reported in February that officers had brought thousands of detainees (mostly black, often low-level drug offenders) to Homan Square, where they were essentially “disappeared”—held and questioned without access to attorneys or phone calls. Of 7,185 people detained there since 2004, Ackerman wrote, just 68 had access to a lawyer or were able to make their whereabouts known to family or friends—about 65 percent of the detentions took place after May 16, 2011, when Emanuel took office.

      https://www.motherjones.com/politics...quare-scandal/
      Or how about this gem? The US government reserves the right to detain indefinitely anyone it deems to be a "terrorist"--even US citizens.

      https://theintercept.com/2019/06/21/...ite-detention/
      Last edited by unhappymeal; 01-01-2020 at 09:18 PM.

    6. #105
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      A Welcome Home

      Reuters from computers;

      One of the sources said Ghosn was greeted warmly by President Michel Aoun on Monday after flying into Beirut via Istanbul and was now in a buoyant and combative mood and felt secure.

      The plan to slip Ghosn out of Japan, which marked the latest twist in a year-old saga that has shaken the global auto industry, was crafted over three months, the two sources said.

      "It was a very professional operation from start to finish," one of them said.

      In his meeting at the presidency, Ghosn thanked Aoun for the support he had given him and his wife Carole while he was in detention, the sources said. He now needs the protection and security of his government after fleeing Japan, the sources added.

      The meeting between Aoun and Ghosn has not been made public and a media adviser to the president's office denied the two men had met. The two sources said specifics of the meeting were described to them by Ghosn.

      https://mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKBN1Z01WD

    7. #106
      Geriatric Member BRealistic's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by unhappymeal View Post
      Hahahahahahahahahaha. Oh bless. I love when Americans get riled up about due process, justice for all and the protection of everyone's rights. I'll just leave this right here:

      Or how about this gem? The US government reserves the right to detain indefinitely anyone it deems to be a "terrorist"--even US citizens.

      https://theintercept.com/2019/06/21/...ite-detention/
      A few locations playing fast and loose with constitutional rights =/= an entire legal system that openly detains for 23 days without counsel or outside contact available while being interrogated to confess.
      I've honestly watched many things about living in Japan.. but this hostage legal system thing is news to me and quite eye opening.
      Most densely populated countries require very aggressive laws and penalties to "maintain the peace".

    8. #107
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      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      A few locations playing fast and loose with constitutional rights =/= an entire legal system that openly detains for 23 days without counsel or outside contact available while being interrogated to confess.
      I've honestly watched many things about living in Japan.. but this hostage legal system thing is news to me and quite eye opening.
      Most densely populated countries require very aggressive laws and penalties to "maintain the peace".
      It doesn't require it. It's most likely a cultural thing. Then again, most Japanese people don't find themselves in a police precinct. But, when they do, they're expected to confess their crimes, unlike in America where you're expected to deny the charges and let your lawyer defend you. It's a different system and one is more effective at crime prevention than another. Also, one society is more crime-ridden than another. I'd let you figure out which is which...

    9. #108
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      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      Most densely populated countries require very aggressive laws and penalties to "maintain the peace".
      Population has absolutely nothing to do with this. I'd wager getting a more fair shake in somewhere like NYC than Bum****, Nowhere if I got arrested. This is a uniquely Japanese thing.

    10. #109
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      Quote Originally Posted by Reisner View Post
      It doesn't require it. It's most likely a cultural thing. Then again, most Japanese people don't find themselves in a police precinct. But, when they do, they're expected to confess their crimes, unlike in America where you're expected to deny the charges and let your lawyer defend you. It's a different system and one is more effective at crime prevention than another. Also, one society is more crime-ridden than another. I'd let you figure out which is which...
      Exactly. Yes, they have the power to do that, but it is not a requirement. You want to talk about crazy powers in a justice system? How about the case of Curtis flowers? Tried seven times for the same crime.

    11. #110
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      ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Turkish police detained seven people, including four pilots, on Thursday in an investigation into how ousted Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn transited through Istanbul en route to Lebanon after fleeing Japan, a police spokeswoman told Reuters.

      She said the other detainees were two airport ground workers and one cargo worker and all seven were expected to give statements before a court on Thursday.

      Media reports said Turkey’s interior ministry had begun an investigation into Ghosn’s transit. The former Nissan (7201.T) boss revealed on Tuesday he had fled to Beirut to escape what he called a “rigged” justice system.

      People familiar with the matter told Reuters that Ghosn, one of the world’s best-known executives, had arrived in Beirut on a private jet from Istanbul on Monday.
      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-n...-idUSKBN1Z10FY

    12. #111
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      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      Most densely populated countries require very aggressive laws and penalties to "maintain the peace".
      Not true at all. A densely populated country like Japan, whether you like the judicial system or not, has a centuries old culture and environment of low crime regardless of number of police or aggressive laws and penalties. So while their judicial system does indeed have ways of interrogation to get a suspect to admit guilt, on a per capita basis Japan commits just a small fraction of violent crimes that the US does.

    13. #112
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      I finally get to use the phrase "bass-cased it" to describe a real situation!
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    14. #113
      Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Vladimir VR6 View Post
      And now that he fled home arrest awaiting trial in a private jet forfeiting multi million $$$ bail (which is by itself an admission of guilt, basically) is there any questions left about whether or not he is guilty...
      Fleeing an unjust nation where you were likely to die in prison on false charges is not an admission of guilt, it's a last-ditch effort to not die in prison. Prisons where they generally have no heat in the winter, no access to healthcare, and are treated as slaves over things like not caring for their hare sufficiently or tucking in their bedsheets tightly enough after making their bed for inspection. I'm not joking about any of that. Oh, and suppose you're in that 0.1% which is acquitted at trial? It doesn't matter, there's no double-jeopardy in Japan so they just try you again in a different court. Again: look it up. The place is rigged.

    15. #114
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      Quote Originally Posted by tbvvw View Post
      So while their judicial system does indeed have ways of interrogation to get a suspect to admit guilt, on a per capita basis Japan commits just a small fraction of violent crimes that the US does.
      Anecdote: they have beer and sake in vending machines in Japan; I asked a friend there how they keep underage people from purchasing it. His English is very good, but he still coudln't comprehend the question--"that would be illegal!"

    16. #115
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      Quote Originally Posted by ghost03 View Post
      Anecdote: they have beer and sake in vending machines in Japan; I asked a friend there how they keep underage people from purchasing it. His English is very good, but he still coudln't comprehend the question--"that would be illegal!"
      Almost sounds German. "What do you mean someone could misuse this? That would be wrong. Clearly they would know not to do this," in response to pressing the re-circulation button while using the defroster....

    17. #116
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      Quote Originally Posted by vwpiloto View Post
      Almost sounds German. "What do you mean someone could misuse this? That would be wrong. Clearly they would know not to do this," in response to pressing the re-circulation button while using the defroster....
      Quote Originally Posted by Doug Butabi View Post
      And on the tenth day of the two thousand fifteenth year, TCL finds out about rich people.

    18. #117
      Geriatric Member BRealistic's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by CTK View Post
      Population has absolutely nothing to do with this. I'd wager getting a more fair shake in somewhere like NYC than Bum****, Nowhere if I got arrested. This is a uniquely Japanese thing.
      Name one densely populated country (non-rich-white) with low crime that doesn't have aggressive laws/enforcement/penalties.

    19. #118
      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      The place is rigged.

    20. #119
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      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      Name one densely populated country (non-rich-white) with low crime that doesn't have aggressive laws/enforcement/penalties.
      Posts like this are exactly why I hate talking politics. Not only the fact that people cling to political beliefs like religious beliefs (i.e. w/o proof or reason- if I tore your argument apart you'd still stand by it), but because the arguments are often so poorly cobbled together they're not worth addressing. What is the objective definition of "aggressive laws/enforcements/penalties"? How is a country with the ~25th highest per capita GDP "poor"? How are "aggressive laws/enforcement/penalties" a driver of high crime? None of this makes any sense.

    21. #120
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      Quote Originally Posted by ghost03 View Post
      Anecdote: they have beer and sake in vending machines in Japan; I asked a friend there how they keep underage people from purchasing it. His English is very good, but he still coudln't comprehend the question--"that would be illegal!"
      Brings back memories of the time my best friend and I travelled to Japan when we were 14 years old and bought our first Asahi 20oz. from the vending machine. It was glorious

    22. #121
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      Quote Originally Posted by masa8888 View Post
      Brings back memories of the time my best friend and I travelled to Japan when we were 14 years old and bought our first Asahi 20oz. from the vending machine. It was glorious
      At age 14 in Germany I could just go up to the counter at the weekend bier fest tent and order a beautiful pilsner on tap...no vending machine needed. Then again I was 6'0" 170lbs at that age.
      As long as you weren't stupid, nobody cared or thought it was unusual if a teen was having a beer next to the adults.

    23. #122
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      Quote Originally Posted by tbvvw View Post
      At age 14 in Germany I could just go up to the counter at the weekend bier fest tent and order a beautiful pilsner on tap...no vending machine needed. Then again I was 6'0" 170lbs at that age.
      As long as you weren't stupid, nobody cared or thought it was unusual if a teen was having a beer next to the adults.
      If you were with your parents that was even legal--pretty sure in Germany for beer it's 13 with parents and 16 without parents. Spirits they're a little more concerned with, but not like here.

    24. #123
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      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      Fleeing an unjust nation where you were likely to die in prison on false charges is not an admission of guilt, it's a last-ditch effort to not die in prison. Prisons where they generally have no heat in the winter, no access to healthcare, and are treated as slaves over things like not caring for their hare sufficiently or tucking in their bedsheets tightly enough after making their bed for inspection. I'm not joking about any of that. Oh, and suppose you're in that 0.1% which is acquitted at trial? It doesn't matter, there's no double-jeopardy in Japan so they just try you again in a different court. Again: look it up. The place is rigged.
      ....meanwhile in the United States, a man was tried and acquitted seven times of the same crime by the same prosecutor despite obvious corruption while having to stare down the death penalty...

    25. #124
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      OK, if we can take a break from the moral superiority masked as politics bull****...........

      Interpol (not the band, the international agency) wants Ghosn

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-n...-idUSKBN1Z10UG

      It's NOT a warrant, just a "hey global law enforcement bros we need this dude thanks" thing

    26. #125
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      Quote Originally Posted by CTK View Post
      OK, if we can take a break from the moral superiority masked as politics bull****...........

      Interpol (not the band, the international agency) wants Ghosn

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-n...-idUSKBN1Z10UG

      It's NOT a warrant, just a "hey global law enforcement bros we need this dude thanks" thing
      And here I was thinking Interpol was in fact the band that performed at his house, and when Ghosn went with them, they simply told the Japanese authorities that "Interpol took him."

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