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    1. #26
      Member Pnuu's Avatar
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      In for another Barry project!

      I'm glad to see that you're feeling up to taking on a new project, and I'm looking forward to learning about the realities of these modern trailers that are often seen as somewhat... Disposable. Construction methods are so strange on many trailers, they seem to be a mix of lightest weight and absolute lowest cost. It makes it hard to stomach the cost of a new one.

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    3. #27
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Pnuu View Post
      In for another Barry project!

      I'm glad to see that you're feeling up to taking on a new project
      Yeah, well, at 68 it's not going to get any easier, but it's good mental and physical exercise. I need to remove some COVID-belly, anyway.

      There will be a slight delay as I'm having a lens replaced in my right eye on the 24th as a cataract formed after recent laser surgery to correct a torn retina.

      It sucks getting old, but that has never stopped me. Slowed me down, but never stopped me.



      I have to say, I do miss posting a good build thread. I get as much out of it as you do.

    4. #28
      Member Stromaluski's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Yeah, well, at 68 it's not going to get any easier, but it's good mental and physical exercise. I need to remove some COVID-belly, anyway.

      There will be a slight delay as I'm having a lens replaced in my right eye on the 24th as a cataract formed after recent laser surgery to correct a torn retina.

      It sucks getting old, but that has never stopped me. Slowed me down, but never stopped me.



      I have to say, I do miss posting a good build thread. I get as much out of it as you do.
      People in my family tend to have long lives and I've heard all my life that you're fine until you stop working on stuff and then everything goes downhill after that.

    5. #29
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Stromaluski View Post
      People in my family tend to have long lives and I've heard all my life that you're fine until you stop working on stuff and then everything goes downhill after that.
      True that. My mother passed at my age, but my father just passed at 92. His most recent wife failed to inform us.

    6. #30
      Member Pnuu's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Yeah, well, at 68 it's not going to get any easier, but it's good mental and physical exercise. I need to remove some COVID-belly, anyway.

      There will be a slight delay as I'm having a lens replaced in my right eye on the 24th as a cataract formed after recent laser surgery to correct a torn retina.

      It sucks getting old, but that has never stopped me. Slowed me down, but never stopped me.



      I have to say, I do miss posting a good build thread. I get as much out of it as you do.
      I hope to keep it up as well as I age. I have heard many times that once you make the choice to slow down in life, the countdown clock begins ticking. My wife and I are planning on a retirement hobby farm as a small business for fun, and maybe some consulting on the side if we feel like it. We have another 20 years or so to continue preparing.

    7. #31
      I'm in. Glad to see you posting up!

      Vince

    8. #32
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by WINDSORB4TDI View Post
      I'm in. Glad to see you posting up!

      Vince
      Me, too. This eye thing had me down for the count for a while. I tore my right retina in 3 places requiring surgery. They removed the natural fluid in my eye and replaced it with Nitrous Oxide that I couldn't see through at all. That was right at the beginning of COVID and I've been pretty shut in ever since. I go to the shop every day, but for weeks all I did was yell at people on the internet. I've done a few small projects once my vision returned, but I couldn't do stained glass at all. The gas dissipates as the natural fluid is replaced. That took 12 weeks.

      During COVID-9 my fairly right-wing neighbor found himself furloughed about the time I was in dire need of maintence around here. Our grasses and other plants had taken over and the ravine behind our homes was slowing absorbing our back yards. I put Jeremy and his 8 year old son to work, and I presented his son with his first official paycheck. His dad video'd him opening the envelope. Turns out he's not as far-right as I thought, he just plays one on the internet. He just fears for his children. As we got to know each other he made some generous statements about wanting to raise his kids next door to us so he could impart on his kid what great role models Jeremy's father and I am. He stole he house next door during the foreclosure insanity. He outbid me by $3,000, but has steadily fixed it up. He's really a great neighbor and looks out for us. I asked him if we needed to arm ourselves soon, and he made it very clear he would protect us. We obviously made an impression on one another.

      They removed a giant chimney and a Colonial cupola and other gingerbread decorations. The octagon window is not a recent styling cue and kind of dates the house, and we talked about bricking it in, but no matter how skilled the mason. a patch would show. I offered to make them an octagon window. They loved the idea. They have access to the attic space behind so I'm making it with appropriate glass so it can be backlit. I offered to make them a crest or coat of arms, a Superman "S" for their last name or any other pattern that wanted.

      Jeremy's wife quickly responded with a Frank Lloyd Wright design that I had already done for the couple that own this trailer. I made stained glass window for everyone that helped us 10 years ago when my wife kicked cancer's ass. Dot was incredibly helpful and Gary always stepped up.



      Oh yeah, he got rid of the gawdawful plastic shutters. The location of the window is perfect for lit glass.



      Removing the muttons helped. but stained glass will be better.



      I rummaged through my wood shop and came up with some plywood to make a template to see whether the pattern needed to be alter to fit, but it'll look great at that scale.







      I post my other projects inter-mixed with my builds. Posting them has always helped me think things through as I write about them. The feedback I get influences the projects, often. You are my hive-mind. I have no mind's eye, nor do I have an inner voice. I don't hear my thoughts or words before I say them as others do. I don't hear a dialog when I read. I don't hear my own voice at all as most other's do. I never outline articles I write and I likely couldn't diagram a sentence if my life depended on it. This is a very healthy outlet for me.


    9. #33
      That is an interesting medical treatment. Hope all is well now.

      You are definitely a man of many talents. I lack the creative and artistic abilities. Solving electrical and mechanical issues I can do. But trying to build something with no plan, not always good results.

      Seeing other people use their talents and divining interesting solutions to problems and fabrication. Then possibly using some of these ideas for my own projects. That's one of the best parts of these forums for me.

      Vince

    10. #34
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by WINDSORB4TDI View Post

      You are definitely a man of many talents. I lack the creative and artistic abilities.
      Vince
      I'm an old hobbiest that compiled a lot of experience, and tools, lots of tools.

      I have no creative abilities. I am a mere artisan. I am good at copying others' work. Take the stained glass project. I tried to make a window of my own design. It was not interesting at all. However, this glass project is more challenging than most. The angle cuts are certainly more difficult, but the challenge is doing them right.

      There's nothing creative about this trailer repair. Somebody else already did the hard work. The engineering. I just have to figure out how to take it apart and fix it. Nothing really creative there.

    11. #35
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      I have been very fortunate in life. I started a business of changing light bulbs 45 years ago and it was very, very, good to me. When I nearly lost my life partner to ovarian cancer 10 years ago I almost lost someone very precious to me. So many paintings in museums are pictures of wives immortalized in art. Wealthy men commissioned artists to capture their significant other on canvas, as photography didn't exist until the turn of the 20th century.

      Just prior to the Pandemic our financial advisors said we needed to so something we've never done. We needed to take some profits before they evaporated. I pulled an arbitrary figure out of the air and had them cash us out of some stocks. My wife and I sat down to make a wish list and we struggled to find a way to spend some money. My wife is a terrible rich person. Until COVID she would haunt the bargain racks at Kohl's, bragging about buying a new pair of Levis for $3.00 after all the coupons and rebates. She relishes being cheap about herself, but has no problem giving away everything we get from Social Security to family members that have needs greater than ours. We're big on critter charities, too. At the rate we're taking retirement money we'll have enough for the next 55 years.

      I waited, and waited, and waited, and my wife never pulled the trigger. I decided I would spend it if she wouldn't. I have enough cars to last me a lifetime so I decided to spend the money on commissioning art. I started out by commissioning Daniel Brown https://www.autoexpressionist.com to do a painting of my wife and her '55 Continental Cabrio or her '97 Z3 that she bought new and now has 66,000 miles on it. People know her and the car as she drives around here singing at the top of her lungs.

      I have a friend that has has Daniel do about a dozen paintings for him of cars and people that are important in his life. I normally only collect photorealism. I don't know how he does it. He doesn't start with a sketch on the canvas as most do. He covers the canvas with dark paint and builds a perspective scene without guidelines. It's rather astonishing to watch his progress. I sent pictures of the Porsche and my wife to Dan. He saw pictures of her Z3 and asked about it and I told him that it's a keepsake. He suggested that he incorporate both cars in a dark scene, as is his trademark to use nighttime lighting as part of his style. He whipped up a concept of having her passing herself in her other car at different ages in her life. He set in an older town that was unfamiliar to me. I suggested that a local scene that was recognizable to us would be better. We started planning a visit to Michigan from Ohio to take pictures of downtown Farmington, Michigan, but that never happened as the travel restrictions kicked in just as I gave Daniel a 50% deposit. After 6 months we got used to life in masks and social distancing and Dan decided it was time for a nighttime photo shoot. While this was supposed to be a surprise for my wife. The concept to have herself shown at a younger age passing her current self in the Z3 was not a chance I wanted to risk, depicting her as a younger woman. That might not go well. I had to let her in on it.

      I contacted the Farmington Civic theatre and asked them to leave their marquee lights on. We picked a Sunday night as traffic was slower. My wife drove the Z3 and I drove the Porsche. I basically drove around the block a dozen times in both cars in both directions while he captured the movement on his digital camera. We left him there to shoot the background material. I wanted an epic painting so I chose a canvas 4 feet by 6 feet. It was so large that he couldn't paint it in his studio so he painted it in his garage, next to his classic car. I don't think it was under 90° the whole week. As is his style he blasts through 90% of the painting and gets bogged down in the details.

      The painting is nearly done. He just needs to paint the edges black and then paint it with a clear coat. My wife has already selected the most prominent place in our home for display. I'll take photos once it's hung.

      Again, I don't know how he achieves such realism with blobs of paint. Those that know my wife will see her face in the details.











      If you have any inclination to commission artwork, now is the time to do it. Art is important and the art community has been decimated now that galleries are closed and venues like art fairs and high-end hobby shows were all cancelled. Most are keeping busy making new art, but that may be for an audience that may never come back. Collecting art is one thing, commissioning art is better, for everyone.

    12. #36
      If it wasn't for patrons commissioning works of art, there would be no record of the history of the world over millenia... Imagine an empty Vatican museum, blank walls at the Louvre, no paintings in Barcelona, no collections in Washington DC, New York, Chicago, Copenhagen, Moscow, Beijing, or the MOMA, Getty, Guggenheim... Wow. What a loss to civilization. Keep investing your money, Barry, you're always making the world a better place, now and for generations to follow. Mazel tov...

    13. #37
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by boogetyboogety View Post
      If it wasn't for patrons commissioning works of art, there would be no record of the history of the world over millenia... Imagine an empty Vatican museum, blank walls at the Louvre, no paintings in Barcelona, no collections in Washington DC, New York, Chicago, Copenhagen, Moscow, Beijing, or the MOMA, Getty, Guggenheim... Wow. What a loss to civilization. Keep investing your money, Barry, you're always making the world a better place, now and for generations to follow. Mazel tov...
      I never gave that a thought, but it's certainly true.

      There's been a logistics delay in getting the trailer to me as their site is heavily wooded and makes retrieval near impossible with a dually. The owner of the park has a front-loader or back-hoe that is much more nimble. Looks like 2 weeks. Perfect timing. My eye will be healed by then and I can go at it.

      I thought I was done bumping my head. I guess not.

    14. #38
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Well, I've been out of touch. I got engrossed in the stained glass project. I also had the lens in my right eye replaced. The laser surgery to reattach a torn retina left it spoiled. That's a common problem. The real problem is that I was uneducated that anybody can bleed into their eye. Scared the **** out of me. Not just old farts, either. Younger people get it. If it happens to you, race to your local retina surgeon.

      I started the stained glass project when I did to test myself to see what improvement there might be for my hobby work. I found that my left eye was focused on the work and my right eye pretty much provides depth perception with minimal clarity. I wish I had never put the tools down. I'm disappointed that I didn't try earlier. It was just like riding a bike. My brain is thoroughly trained for mono vision.

      I did this before the surgery. This is being anal-rententive, just to be anal-retentive. The cuts are all capped in solder, so the cuts don't show, ever. I do it because I can. The pieces are tacked together, the assembly is flipped, finish soldered on the rear, flipped and finish soldered on the front. Then it's cleaned with a special soap that removes flux and cleans the zinc framework. At that point you can let it weather or apply a chemical that gives the zinc a patina. Some of the dark marks you see a joints are sharpie left from the original cut. Typically it takes 3 cuts to get to a suitable fit. Some people are so good at cutting they measure once and cut once. I measure twice and cut 3 times.



      I was fortunate enough to find a Honda carb for $124. Not sure what was wrong with the old one, but I don't care. It required full choke to run and fuel was spilling out what is suppose to provide fresh air in. It's handy that I kept my old hilo as a great equipment hoist and a means to move trailers and pallets around.

      While I only used this twice last year, It does a great job. This is a 1983 Honda HT3813, a prized piece of lawn equipment still in service world wide. They are worth more in parts than whole. The 38" snow thrower is a private-labeled US product that was exported, too. I'm finding that my well-made equipment is worth spending money on, as long as I can find parts. Making parts can prove more difficult.



      Put some LED lamps in the TR-6 art. We use it as a nightlight.

      Last edited by barry2952; 09-26-2020 at 04:07 PM.

    15. #39
      Member BlackMiata's Avatar
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      Glad to hear you are on the mend and getting back to doing things you love to do, that's what keeps us young. Always enjoy reading about your adventure, thank you.

    16. #40
      Member Pnuu's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post

      WOW. Just... Wow.

      We once commissioned a painting of a family member's dog and gave it to them as a wedding gift. It was probably the most fun gift I've ever participated in.

    17. #41
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Pnuu View Post
      WOW. Just... Wow.

      We once commissioned a painting of a family member's dog and gave it to them as a wedding gift. It was probably the most fun gift I've ever participated in.
      People commission others to do their work all the time. Art can be in many forms. One might say that people commission me to restore their cars. My work was on display in a few museums.



      Towards the end of last year my wife sent me a link to an artist, as she often does. It doesn't necessarily mean she wants something from that artist, it's just a means of sharing. She was especially taken by this NY artist's critters. Since it's nearly impossible for her to pull the trigger and actually spend money, I went on a spree.

      I contacted the artist and he gently put me off. Well, he kinda blew me off as he was quite busy. When the Pandemic hit his phones stopped ringing, as did everyone's in the art community. Galleries locked down, lifestyle shows closed down and cancelled. Most artist friends used the lock down time to create new art for a market that no longer exists. Art is a huge segment of our economy that's been devastated. So may people are dumping art onto the secondary market that buying newly crafted art has gotten very expensive by comparison. Many don't know what the secondary market is. It can be a crushing place to be. My father invested his retirement money in new art, a really silly thing to do. What was fashionable 40 years is not necessary valuable today. This is how he secondary market works. Like selling a used car to a dealer, you do so at a lower price than retail so the dealer makes money and stays in business. In the art world it appears that unlike cars, the value drops by 75% as you carry the art out the door. If I bought an item for $1,000 the resale price drops by 50% and you get half of that so the dealer can stick your folly on a shelf and still make money when it's sold in a week, or a year. So, buying newly crafted art for investment is a poor choice. You buy new art to enjoy and participate in the experience. You buy used art, made by a dead artist, for investment.

      So, I saw Philippe's work and asked if he would do a giraffe bust for my wife as an anniversary gift to celebrate our 48th. I'm impossible to buy for. I contacted the artist and started getting educated on his practices. He creates the clay art at no charge. If you don't like what he produces you move on. Before he starts he makes you aware of the cost in making a ceramic or a bronze. If you select a ceramic he builds it hollow, for that purpose. Solid clay will explode in the firing process. If it's end is to be made in bronze the original is disposable once a mold has been made. It's also a means to make additional copies on demand. Going in I knew that he was planning a limited edition of 6.

      Here's https://philippefaraut.com making the giraffe bust.



      In our conversations we got to talking about our lone-term spouses and he asked if I would consider a package including a bust of my wife. I was intrigued. She did a life cast by https://www.marcsijan.com in 1989 and I've immortalized her in sculpture before, se we explored that. At that point it was supposed to be a surprise gift. I gathered up and scanned 150 photos of her from the 50 years we've been together. While I don't think she's changed that much he wanted to sculpt her at about half her current age. I have't been married 48 years by being stupid. Surprising her with a bust at 30-ish might not have gone over well, so I brought her in on the process. While I like surprising her, the involvement was a sufficient surprise. This is one of one, but I would not object to someone requesting a copy.

      This is astounding. You can see the photos that he used in his demonstration. The change he makes is worth watching. The video goes on to show the mold-making process. The foundry took some shots that will be part of the video.


    18. #42
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      The trailer is being delivered Tuesday.

      Daniel Brown is delivering the 4' x 6' painting today. Wife is thrilled.

      I finished the Frank Lloyd Wright window for the next-door neighbor. They are thrilled. They made great glass and pattern choices. I started the piece before my eye surgery and finished it 2 days later. What a breeze. No difference. I guess I just used one eye for close work. I went to sleep, they pulverized the laser-damaged lens and popped in a new one through a large bore needle. I woke up with 20/40 vision and I was pleased. 2 days later I had, and maintained, 20/20 vision. I just wear one contact now. Even though I'm 68, worked under the sun much of my life, and I'm blue-eyed, I have no cataract in my other eye. This would be life-changing for someone with cataracts in both eyes.

      I built a low-voltage light station for an MR-16 Lamp out of junk I had lying around my magic building. Are any of you old enough to remember Felix the Cat and his "Magic Bag of Tricks"?



      Anybody need a good gas-powered bucket truck?



      It's 20" across the flats of the octagon. I gave the zinc came a black patina so that the grid shows up during the day.



      Is it just me or does this look like it's always been there?





      Back-lit. I've offered to make one of these for a $500 contribution to my favorite charity, mittensfordetroit.com.


    19. #43
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      Glad the eye surgery went well! The stained glass looks great, can't wait to see you tear into the trailer!
      Quote Originally Posted by sosumi on the B6 S4 V8
      It sounds like a giant shotgun and then like a bunch of ground up Yugo's in a cement mixer followed by weeks of silence interspersed by wails from the owner.

    20. #44
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      Nicely done Barry it looks fantastic.

      It does look like it belongs there, the house was just waiting for an artisan to complete it. Interesting how the appearance changes with lighting, in the window picture the central diamond is bright, but in the last picture, with the central diamond being dark I visualize an Eagle with outstretched wings, what a nice addition to the house. And yes, I do remember Feliz the Cat.

    21. #45
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by BlackMiata View Post
      Nicely done Barry it looks fantastic.

      It does look like it belongs there, the house was just waiting for an artisan to complete it. Interesting how the appearance changes with lighting, in the window picture the central diamond is bright, but in the last picture, with the central diamond being dark I visualize an Eagle with outstretched wings, what a nice addition to the house. And yes, I do remember Feliz the Cat.
      It's actually a stylized Tulip. I didn't see it, either.

      Well, I had more fun today than one old guy should be entitled to. The two of us had a blast.

      No one understands how I think. I have no inner voice, I have no "mind's eye" and I'm not a linear thinker. I don't hear any voices telling me my next steps, it just comes to me from what I call the "ether". I also have no facial memory. I always recognize my wife, but of she leaves the room I can't picture her face. I guess I'm a "big-picture" thinker and the periphery thoughts don't even register.

      When Gary showed up at 10:00 I was ready to go to work. I had a plan. I needed to make it safe to work under. The front leveling jack wasn't working at all, though in this 2017 photo they both worked fine.



      Gary worked in the telecommunications industry in more a management capacity, but has decent tool-handling skills while my last helper never changed his own oil.



      My first instinct as an electrician was to check for power. We had 12 volts. By process of elimination I tried swapping switches and both switches were good, but they both stuck. It kinda led you to believe that it was some kind of automatic feature when what was happening was that the automatic circuit breaker was tripping each time the switch stuck in the up or down position. I did some quick research and found that the seized lift had a common problem of the switch causing the unit to bind, in either direction. I suggested that no amount of contact cleaner is going to clear up the problem without taking the switch apart. I suggested that it may be more cost-effective to simply buy new polarity-switching rocker switches. That's how you reverse the rotation of a DC motor, simply switch the leads. They will be in Saturday.

      When Gary operated the switch for the working rear jack I got that sick feeling in my stomach that something was going to break. I stopped him in time. Today we took the working unit off and cleaned and lubricated all the proper points. It showed no sign of ever being lubricated, even from the factory. With them using it as a park trailer they had no need to even think about the lifts, until they had to move it. Since only the electric tongue jack was holding it up I was loath to work under it. We got the rear one working fine and installed it on the front to take the load off the spindly tongue lift.



      I used the manual winder on the shaft and broke both ends of the roll pin the tool moved against. I used a cam-operated stud remover and heard it break the rust ring that seized it. I worked it back and forth and hooked it up to my Lithium jumper battery and it started working. We thoroughly cleaned and lubricated it and put it back in action. I punched out the roll pin and will replace it.



      I wore out Gary. I surprise everyone that ever works with me. I just go at it. Can't explain it.

      Tomorrow we remove the damaged ladder and trim. I had Gary buy a vibratory saw like I had Tom buy for his trailer. Tomorrow I'll show him how it works when we cut away damaged metal. I find it incredible that I can't carry a glass of water in my right hand without sloshing it all over the room, but Gary will attest that simply putting a tool in my right hand makes a solid connection that lasts for a while. I didn't shake at all. I guess I'm not your average PD patient.

      https://app.photobucket.com/images/g...OwpMQDw-Cfzw__

    22. #46
      Member HotCarlWeathers's Avatar
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      This thread is great. I absolutely love that stained glass. I'd love to "buy" one for my wife if I could just find the right place for it...hmm...
      I am not associated with Weber-Stephens wonderful American-made grilling products, nor with Guy Fieri or Martin's Famous Potato Rolls.

    23. #47
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Today was the big reveal. I needed to remove the smashed material to see the actual structural damage. This looks pretty bad.





      I couldn't guarantee that new ladder would go back in the same place so I removed the top curved section below that mounting point. I attached a steel stud to the back wall to act as a guide to cut the FRP, fiberglass reinforced panel. It's about 1/8" thick. I had Gary buy a new Dremel saw and taught him how to use it. It's a great tool for controlled cuts.







      It didn't get any better looking as I peeled back the layers.





      The vibrating saw worked incredibly well on removing globs of sealant that sealed remarkably well. This is a very nicely built trailer.

      I can tell how this trailer was built by this reveal. The doubled rectangular aluminum tubing is pretty substantial. There is extensive use of styrofoam. The walls use it for insulation and sound deadening while the roof uses it as a structural member. The laminated roof panels are a 1/4" high-quality plywood bonded to about 3" of higher density Styrofoam bonded to some type of alloy sheet metal. I've seen this kind of construction before and it's very strong and energy efficient. The ends of the panels sit on and attach to the aluminum grid work of the sides. I probably shouldn't jump up and down on it, but it didn't move much with me on it.

      The tree dented the rafter and drove it down about 3".



      The welds held up fine.



      Here's the structural damage.



      The side FRP is a thinner glass panel with a thin plywood substrate. It it were aluminum I could straighten it out. I think I'll have to remove some to straighten this beam. I'm thinking about using the hydraulics of my hilo working against the weight of the trailer.


    24. #48
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      On closer examination there was already a crack in one of the folds.



      I needed to expose the other side of the kink.



      Using my come-along attached to the building rafter I applied upward tension and massaged the metal and re-formed a rectangular tube of that mess.



      I got it to 1° of being straight and the crack expanded, but that allowed me to bend it straight. I drilled a few holes which allowed me to use a drift punch to punch out the indented metal on the other side.



      I really don't want to TIG on this. Too flammable and too risky for this repair. I'm having an .035 sleeve bent to cap the broken plate. I'll probably epoxy and carriage bolt it in place. Opening up the side revealed that I will be able to slip in a one piece bendable plywood panel to replace the two sections destroyed in the crunch. I'll have Gary check to see if we can get a sheet of the prefinished material. Everything is nailed, screwed or stapled into the aluminum. I will say that the staples and nails were difficult to remove, making them a decent fastener. The screws are all standard square drive screws used in the industry. They are far less susceptible to stripping, over Phillips.



      My next step is to cut away the plywood on the rest of the ceiling of the closet.
      Last edited by barry2952; 10-09-2020 at 10:00 PM.

    25. #49
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      I spent a couple of hours pondering and planning. I've devised a way to get the closet ceiling panels in place. When I removed the chunk of damaged side panel it revealed a space between the wall top and the roof structure that the ceiling material was ripped out of.

      Note the ceiling panel The other end was shattered. I will be able to vacate that space snd slide a new panel in through the same gap now exposed on the other end. The lower curved pane will slip into place and bent over and butted up to the existing paneling. I would just have to fashion and new side panel to replace the crushed one.



      With key elements back in there proper alignment I can proceed with removing a section of the structural roof paneling.



      This picture might be a little hard to decipher. The stressed engineered roof panel is made of a high grade plywood glued to 2 1/2" thick sheet of styrofoam insulation. Glued to that are sheets of thin galvanized strips of steel in a latticework that allows walls and cabinets to be screwed to the ceiling firmly. Attached to that is a full sheet of thin vinyl wrap over a luan base. Line up (8) 4 x 8 sections and you have a finished 32' roof and ceiling as an assembly They used the same vinyl material to make the strips that covered the gaps.

      In the lower right you can see the wall of the closet below. I need to cut the paneling above that wall about 3/4" back from that wall to all the new panel to slip into that gap.



      I need to peel the roof on the other side back far enough to cut away the roof panel in a straight line. I'll have to cut it into 6" squares to minimize the grip that the wood has on the styrofoam. The styrofoam will be removed giving me access to cut the metal and remove the paneling.

      Note the curve on the far end.



      Once the paneling, foam and metal are out pf the way I've devised a way to get the new panel on place.

      This is the same gap I pointed out earlier. The new panel will slide through to the other side.

      Once the paneling is in place the new brace will be installed.



      I cut what I thought was just a J-channel as a gutter. It turns out that it is a gutter but it's also the fitting for capturing the awning. It was discharging water right over a hatch. I cut the channel off where it will just drip on the ground.



      I cannot restore the strength of the section of stressed panel I have to remove. I will attempt to duplicate the panel with sheet metal. adhesives, and strong plywood, but in no way would I be able to duplicate the strength. Knowing that the original FRP curved skin would be the weak link I came up with the idea of capping the "repaired" panel with diamond plate perfectly bent to match the original curve. Bending the panel in that manner adds a huge amount of strength to the curve. The new panel covers the roof with an impenetrable structural member that would attach to an original section of roof and on both sides of the trailer and then weatherproofed in traditional manner. I will use stainless step flashing like you would use between sections of wood paneling to keep water out of a the transition from aluminum to FRP.



      The owners like the idea. I assured them that it wouldn't stay shiny, likely turning nearly he same color as the paneling, but I could speed that process with a chemical patina.



      I'll have the shop foreman from Lyndon Fabricating stop by and make a bending template from the other side. They make delicate curves, not with rollers, but with mapped out bending points that are close enough together to appear to be a rolled curve in a 4' x 8' sheet of aluminum. I believe they use hydraulic press brakes that are older than I am. I will install the new LED running lights using the old fiberglass section as a guide.

      Last edited by barry2952; 10-10-2020 at 04:52 PM.

    26. #50
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      The new diamond plate will end 3" forward of the line I marked. It was instantly apparent that there was a significant slope built into the roof. Tell the truth. How many of you own an 8-foot level?



      I found another puncture. We're going to have to closely examine this roof. It looks like an attached limb hit the roof before the trunk and pierced the rubber. Gary is going to swab the whole roof clean so we can look for hole. They typically trap dirt and stand out on a clean roof.



      The marked line is where I'm going to cut to remove the rest of the panel so I can have access to the ceiling panel of the trailer. The new diamond plate cap will slide under the rubber and will be sealed using standard trailer technology.



      Gary is an excellent helper. Never a squawk about cleaning up my messes.



      This was time consuming and necessary. I still had to use a flat bar to remove the paneling in 6 x 6 inch pieces. It had to break the styrofoam as the glue held tight.



      It was quite a task to remove the styrofoam, but now you can see what I was trying to get to. The paneling will be trimmed back further.



      I never was very good at cleaning up after myself. After a year of military school I rejected tidiness.



      This part was crushed on the other side. I'll use this a template. This is the shape of the inner ceiling and outer sheathing. I'll duplicate it's thickness by glueing some plywood together.


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