Another trailer mishap. - Page 3
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    1. #51
      Member barry2952's Avatar
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      Jun 13th, 2007
      Location
      Farmington Hills, MI
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      18,589
      Stainless steel brace, or no brace, I couldn't leave this like this. I was telling Gary that I write about my projects, partially for the entertainment of others, but mostly because it is a big part of my thought process. With no inner voice and no mind's eye I use the photos I take to help me understand the subtleties of what I need to do next. I use feedback to catch glaring mistakes, and I do take every suggestion into consideration, but I let the work take me where I need to go.

      This told me I didn't want my name associated with trying to save this due to being scared to death to bring a TIG welder anywhere all this styrofoam. I started thinking about the cars I've built or restored and got to thinking about aircraft construction. It's all about the bracing and proper fasteners.



      It had to go. I checked how far back I had to cut to get to square stock. I used the new Dremel saw to make some incredibly fast and straight cuts.



      There was nothing I could do about this. The bent rafter transferred some of the energy to the rectangular stock side railand turned it into a trapezoid. I didn't see it before, by the weld was broken, too. Glad I took it out.



      They used the same material for the rafter as the side rail. It's lightweight 1" x 3" aluminum with a 1/16" wall. What seems to be available is 1/8" wall. I've made a request of the manufacturer for an exact replacement. I can use the heavier stock, If I need to. I found the replacement ladder, too.

      I used my 100-tooth carbide blade to make a new section of the side rail out of a straight section salvaged from the bent rafter.



      I made two internal sleeve supports cut out of one piece of tubing precisely cutting them so that they would jamb each other in place as they were inserted into the trailer side rail. One didn't go in as far as the other, but there's a good 6" of overlapping sleeve on either side of the joint.







      I repaired the curved section in a similar fashion.



      Demolition is now complete. I believe commercial grade pop rivets through the stainless cap and two layers of aluminum will be a substantial splice without any welding.



      I duplicated the good rear curve spacer. The inner radius clamps down the inner closet ceiling curve and the outer curved material screws down to the larger radius.


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    3. #52
      Member barry2952's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 13th, 2007
      Location
      Farmington Hills, MI
      Posts
      18,589
      Getting proper material out of he manufacturer has been like pulling teeth. However, their record-keeping has proven invaluable in getting matching paneling. It has a layer of vinyl that allows it to bend without cracking. It was $28 a sheet, so I got 2 because the transportation to Elkhart and back is $250.00 for me to send someone to get it. The manufacturer usually ships direct to its dealers freight-allowed, but my order for aluminum trim that's 16-feet long and very hard to find 2.5" x 1" x .055 wall is unavailable through normal supply channels. Apparently, they use so much of it it's milled to their specs.

      I did get $111.00 worth of high quality aluminum rivets in various lengths. Unlike big-range pull like pop rivets these rivets are to be used within a very narrow range. Many of the joined brackets have interior and exterior bracing that I will have to gauge. I sent Gary after some clear white pine to use in reassembling the trailer and I schooled him on the grade I was looking for. He was astounded at what passes for lumber in the lower grades. I had him pick up some foam board so I can rebuild the smashed wall. It will be part of recreating the original construction method. The foam board gets bonded to the outer skin and to the inner paneling with contact cement.



      One of the things they wanted me to do was to critter-proof the underside of the trailer. They use a pretty sturdy extruded PVC underbelly skin, but they missed many spots a mouse could easily get into. The way their rib cages collapse they can get through any gap they can get their head through. The also build nests in the hollow exposed tubing of the part of the frame that carries the torque-flex suspension. Many a car has been destroyed by mice setting up their home in a boxed car frame. They constantly add to they nest because they urinate on it and that said eats the metal from the inside. The grey water discharge pipe had been duct-taped, but that was just flaking off.



      I use strips of DynaMat I cut on a paper cutter into large bandaid-size pieces that easily bridge the gap, making to impossible for a mouse to chew through the metal and tar-based pad.



      Just after Gary left one day I guess I became dehydrated and stumbled and fell. My arm took the brunt of the blow and got pretty ugly before it got better. I was supposed to get a Botox shot to control the PD shake, but the doc said, "Nope!" I believe I've astounded Gary several times that I can go from shaking like a leaf to surgeon-steady the moment I touch any tool.



      The splice Lyndon made me is a perfect fit. It will unify the wall/roof connection. This will be held in place with rivets.



      Now you can see the gentle curve of the roof. I gouged out enough space to slide in a 1x3 to splice the roof skin. Another will be installed across the splice between the closet wall and the new ceiling panel, doubling as an anchor point for the sliding closet doors. Once the inner panels are in place and the aluminum rafter is in place my intent is to install expanding foam as insulation and fill the void to structurally stabilize the roof section.



      This gives me the opportunity to tell my expanding foam story. When I was young and foolish I wanted to build a wood hydroplane. Every day I passed a boat supply place on my ride to school on the bus. They had a skeletal build of a kit in their front window. When I got kicked out of the house for beating my brother for stealing my coin collection to buy "candy". 40 years later I found out that "candy" was heroin. I moved in with a HS class-mate that was a year older. He had a 1,200 square foot apartment in a nice part of Detroit in 1970. I took the smaller bedroom. His girlfriend moved in, all hell broke loose and I cam home to a mostly empty apartment with a bunch of broken dishes and a plaster "Love" statue of an intertwined couple smashed to bits. I never heard from either one again, so I inherited his apartment and his cat. I moved into the master bedroom and decided that the 10 x 12 bedroom on the second floor would be the perfect place to build a 9-foot by 5-foot hydroplane. It wasn't a bad place to work, but the deep green shag carpet took a beating.

      The boat was built. I did a pretty nice job for an 18 year-old and I didn't want it to sink so I decided to fill every cavity with expanding foam. I bought a one gallon kit. I bought a half gallon Pyrex measuring cup. It weighed a ton. My plan was to mix a half-gallon of foam and evenly distribute it. I had no idea what I was about to do. I measured out a quart of the resin and cleared a path so I come walk around the boat. I never got the second quart into the mixing cup and it started growing exponentially. I literally ran around the boat distributing the growing foam as best I could, but it spilled over the sides forming stalactites that firmly attached the boat to the deep green shag. My vision clouded and my breathing became strained as it started raining in the spare bedroom. It was the middle of the winter and the poorly insulated attic made the ceiling cold and all that moisture released by the foam condensed on the cold ceiling and fell in a regular light rain pattern. Gasping for air I rushed to window and cranked the casement window open and the native air pressure of the building caused frigid air into the room that turned the air to fog. I couldn't find the door. I fell to he floor, like in a fire, but that didn't help. I crawled to the door and stumbled into the living room, exhausted. It took me hours to cut off what attached to the floor and to carve the rest until the outer skin would fit. I mostly fished it, but bought a 190SL that had Fred Flintstone floorpans and an "O" shift pattern. My attention went elsewhere and the boat got flipped over in the yard. A family of possum carved out a condo in the foam and made our dogs crazy, for years. When I moved here 25 years ago I went to move the boat and the only thing holding it together was the fiberglass matting. Mother Nature remained the rest. She probably did me a favor.

      One of the tasks they asked me to do was install a larger flat screen, a much larger tv. While most people would draw up plans, I just do. In the doing the refinement of a cardboard template to a working woof adapter took little time. I'm able to create a 3D object without being it it my head. I will turn this over to the metal fab guy and have him make it in 3/32" stainless.





      I tested the wood template and it held the weight just fine, but the adapter should be steel or aluminum.

      The entertainment center wasn't working properly. A harness connector had come loose, but I did find some aftermarket hackwork splice using wireuts instead of crimp compactors. Gobs of tape doesn't help.



      Dot had complained that draining the water heater for winer storage let water into the trailer. I discovered a poor sealant installation that let water run into the trailer. I. thinking the Dynamat would do a great job making it water-tight. I showed Gary how to clean and lubricate the bump-outs gear and rack system. They are the sort of thing that should be operated every once in a while to keep things moving. The new switches he bought work great. No more self-operating switches. That was smoky to be working under it and hearing the lift try and work. I think what was happening it the switch would stick and the unit circuit breaker, rated at 6 amps, would open when it overloaded and started again when the bi-metal breaker reset itself. I figured out why water was getting into a storage area, wiping the Honey Do list pretty clean. Everything works!

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